Historical Page List

API endpoint for viewing page history.

Filter fields

You can filter the result set by providing the following query parameters:

  • name -- Filter by name, exact.
  • slug -- Filter by page slug. Supports the standard lookup types
  • region -- Filter by region. Allows for chained filtering on all of the filters available on the region resource, e.g. region__slug.

And the usual set of historical filter fields:

  • history_user - filter by the user resource of the editor, if user was logged in. Allows for chained filtering on all of the filters available on the user resource, e.g. history_user__username.
  • history_user_ip - filter by the IP address of the editor.
  • history_date - filter by history date. Supports the standard lookup types
  • history_type - filter by history type id, exact.

Ordering

You can order the result set by providing the ordering query parameter with the value of one of:

  • slug
  • history_date

You can reverse ordering by using the - sign, e.g. -slug.

GET /api/v4/pages_history/
HTTP 200 OK Vary: Accept Content-Type: text/html; charset=utf-8 Allow: GET, HEAD, OPTIONS
{ "count": 1171138, "next": "https://ja.localwiki.org/api/v4/pages_history/?p=2", "previous": null, "results": [ { "url": "https://ja.localwiki.org/api/v4/pages_history/1399286/", "name": "Front Page", "slug": "front page", "content": "<p>\n \tWelcome to the new LocalWiki region for \u9ec3\u9577\u798f\u5bb6\u65cf!\n <p>\n \tClick on <strong>Explore</strong> at the top to see what's here now.</p>\n <p>\n \tYou can edit this and any other page by clicking the <strong>Edit</strong> button.</p>\n <p>Need <strong>help</strong>? Please see the <a href=\"http://localwiki.net/main/Help\">help page</a> on the <a href=\"http://localwiki.net/main/\">LocalWiki Guide</a>!</p>", "region": "https://ja.localwiki.org/api/v4/regions/2555/", "history_comment": null, "history_date": "2021-07-24T12:25:07.542", "history_type": 0, "history_user": "https://ja.localwiki.org/api/v4/users/34061/", "history_user_ip": "2401:e180:8811:2037:650c:30d1:4ba7:ab46" }, { "url": "https://ja.localwiki.org/api/v4/pages_history/1399285/", "name": "Helen Tanner Brodt", "slug": "helen tanner brodt", "content": "<p>\n\t<span class=\"image_frame image_frame_border image_right\"><img src=\"_files/NPS.jpg\" style=\"width: 300px; height: 375px;\"><span style=\"width: 300px;\" class=\"image_caption\">self portrait <sup>1</sup></span></span></p>\n<p>\n\t<strong>Helen Alice Tanner Brodt</strong> (April 21, 1838 \u2013 March 10, 1909) was an artist of some note, and the namesake of <a href=\"https://www.nps.gov/places/lake_helen.htm\">Lake Helen</a> in Lassen Volcanic National Park. She's said to be the first white woman to climb the Mt. Lassen peak, and following the climb, expedition leader Major Pierson B. Reading named the lake for her. She also taught art in the Oakland schools; her husband was educator <a href=\"A.W.%20Brodt\">Aurelius W. (\"A.W.\") Brodt</a>. <sup>1</sup></p>\n<h3>\n\tArt career</h3>\n<p>\n\t<span class=\"image_frame image_frame_border image_right\"><img src=\"_files/Mount_Shasta_viewed_through_trees_Helen_Tanner_Brodt.jpg\" style=\"width: 239px; height: 300px;\"><span style=\"width: 239px;\" class=\"image_caption\">pastels; Mt. Shasta through the trees by Helen Tanner Brodt<br>\n\tfrom UC Berkeley Bancroft Library</span></span></p>\n<p>\n\tTanner Brodt attended the National Academy of Design in New York City. After moving to Oakland, in 1867, she became the first art instructor of noted artist <a href=\"Arthur%20F.%20Mathews\">Arthur F. Mathews</a>. <sup>1</sup> Mathews was the brother of architect <a href=\"Walter%20J.%20Mathews\">Walter J. Mathews</a>.</p>\n<p>\n\tWhile she produced some landscapes, Tanner Brodt was best known for painting portraits. Several of her paintings and drawings are owned by the UC Berkeley Bancroft Library. The <a href=\"Oakland%20Museum%20of%20California\">Oakland Museum of California</a> also has some of her art supplies, a watercolor tray and a box of pastels. <sup>3</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tOne of Tanner Brodt's better-known portraits was of abolitionist <a href=\"https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Brown_(abolitionist)\">John Brown</a>, which was painted in 1864 (apparently based on a well-known daguerreotype), under the supervision of Mrs. Brown. <sup>5</sup> The painting was given to Storer College at Harper's Ferry, and may be hanging in the Harper's Ferry National Historical Park. <sup>5</sup> Another source says it's in the collection of the Smithsonian. <sup>6</sup> (See also <a href=\"https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-1-4039-7846-2_4\">John Brown, Bearded Patriarch</a> which says there was both an oil painting and a painting on a ceramic or metal plate.)</p>\n<p>\n\tKnown portraits include:</p>\n<ul>\n\t<li>\n\t\tself portrait</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\tAurelius W. Brodt</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Brown_(abolitionist)\">John Brown</a>, abolitionist</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lillie_Langtry\">Lillie Langtree</a>, actress</li>\n</ul>\n<p>\n\tHer portrait of the \"Jersey Lily\", Lillie Langtree, is said to have hung in <a href=\"https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roy_Bean\">Judge Roy Bean's</a> courthouse saloon, The Jersey Lilly. <sup>7</sup></p>\n<h3>\n\tFamily</h3>\n<p>\n\tHelen Tanner was born in Elmira, New York, in 1838 to Joshua and Sarah Tanner. After attending the National Academy of Design in New York City, she married A.W. Brodt in 1861, and they moved west to Red Bluff, California, in 1863. In August 1864, they were camping near Mt. Lassen when Major Reading's party spotted the smoke of their campfire. He invited them to join their climbing expedition, and on August 28, 1864, she became the first white woman to summit Mt. Lassen. <sup>1,2</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tHelen and A.W. had four children: daughter <strong>Ethel Brodt (Wilson)</strong> (1865 \u2013 1947), son <strong>Paul W. Brodt</strong> (1868 \u2013 1946), daughter <strong>Wyntie Bogardus Brodt</strong> (1875 \u2013 1963), and son <strong>Shirley M. Brodt</strong> (1876 \u2013 1899). Ethel and Paul were born in Tehama County; Wyntie and Shirley were born in Oakland.</p>\n<h3>\n\tDeath and Burial</h3>\n<p>\n\tTanner Brodt died in Berkeley in 1909. After a funeral at the First Christian Church of Berkeley, her remains were interred at \"The Hights\". <sup>4</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tThe Brodt's son Shirley was also interred there following his death in 1899.</p>\n<h3>\n\tShirley's Death</h3>\n<p>\n\tThe Brodt's youngest son, Shirley, died in 1899 under somewhat mysterious circumstances. He was 23 years old, and working for his father at the Ralston Health Food Company.</p>\n<p>\n\tOn November 19, 1899, Shirley fell from the roof of the family house, breaking his neck or back. A neighbor, W.H. Weilbye was passing by at the time and saw Shirley's body in midair. Death was not instantaneous and a doctor was summoned, but Shirley died within an hour.</p>\n<p>\n\tThe <em>San Francisco Chronicle</em> had the headline \"Plunged Madly To His Death\" with the subhead \"Circumstances indicate that it was a deliberate suicide\", noting <em>\"Members of the family refuse to express an opinion as to whether the fall was due to accident or intent but some circumstances point strongly to suicide.\"</em> The article described Shirley as <em>\"morose and rather eccentric.\"</em> <sup>8</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tThe <em>Sacramento Record-Union</em> went with \"Broke His Neck\" and \"An Oakland Man Throws Himself From a Roof.\" The article said Shirley was <em>\"Stricken with grief over the waning of his mental faculties.\"</em> <sup>9</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tThe <em>Oakland Tribune</em> had \"Shirley Brodt Takes His Life\" and \"Dived From a Third Story Window and Broke His Neck.\" His father noted that he had been behaving strangely for a month. The article posits that \"Young Brodt was evidently out his mind,\" and said W.H. Weilbye described <em>\"the awful jump as closely resembling a high dive made by a good swimmer.\"</em> <sup>10</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tDespite these colorful descriptions and headlines suggesting it was suicide, the next day the coroner ruled the fall was accidental. <sup>11</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tA funeral was held at the family home, and Shirley's remains were interred at \"The Hights\", <a href=\"Joaquin%20Miller\">Joaquin Miller's</a> estate where <a href=\"Joaquin%20Miller%20Park\">Joaquin Miller Park</a> is now. Miller was good friends with the Brodt family, and suggested the location. <sup>12</sup></p>\n<h2>\n\tLinks and References</h2>\n<ol>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.nps.gov/people/tanner-brodt.htm\">Helen Tanner Brodt</a> nps.gov</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://books.google.com/books?id=CXjPAAAAMAAJ&amp;lpg=PA488&amp;dq=a%20woman%20pioneer%20on%20lassen%20peak%20overland%20monthly&amp;pg=PA488#v=onepage&amp;q&amp;f=false\">A Woman Pioneer on Lassen's Peak</a> <em>Overland Monthly and Out West Magazine</em> November 1924</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"http://collections.museumca.org/?q=collection-item/a65173381\">watercolors A65.173.38.1</a>, <a href=\"http://collections.museumca.org/?q=collection-item/a65173382\">pastels A65.173.38.2</a> Gift of Virginia Perry Wilson (granddaughter), Oakland Museum of California</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.newspapers.com/clip/81984555/helen-tanner-brodt-funeral-interment/\">Aged Artist Buried Among Many Flowers</a> <em>Oakland Tribune</em> March 12, 1908</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.newspapers.com/clip/81986844/helen-tanner-brodt/\">Not in Napa Library</a> <em>Sacramento Bee</em> January 28, 1933</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"http://www.saratogahistory.com/History/sarah_brown.htm\">Sarah Brown, Artist and Abolitionist</a> Saratoga Historical Foundation</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://napavalleyregister.com/lifestyles/real-napa/columnists/rebecca-yerger/rebecca-yerger-memory-lane-the-women-of-wilson-s-inn/article_4d568a9d-9fcf-5486-b227-73b5f2d462a9.html\">Rebecca Yerger, Memory Lane: The Women of Wilson\u2019s Inn</a> <em>Napa Valley Register</em> March 24, 2019</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.newspapers.com/clip/81989745/shirley-brodt-suicide/\">Plunged Madly To His Death</a> <em>San Francisco Chronicle</em> November 20, 1899</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.newspapers.com/clip/82056681/shirley-brodt-throws-himself-from-a/\">Broke His Neck</a> <em>Sacramento Record-Union</em> November 20, 1899</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.newspapers.com/clip/82068795/shirley-brodt-takes-his-life/\">Shirley Brodt Takes His Life</a> <em>Oakland Tribune</em> November 20, 1899</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.newspapers.com/clip/81988831/shirley-brodts-death-from-fall/\">Shirley Brodt's Death Accidental</a> <em>Oakland Tribune</em> November 21, 1899</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.newspapers.com/clip/81988993/shirley-brodt-buried-on-the-heights/\">Buried On The Heights</a> <em>San Francisco Call</em> November 24, 1899</li>\n</ol>\n", "region": "https://ja.localwiki.org/api/v4/regions/340/", "history_comment": null, "history_date": "2021-07-24T10:53:01.363", "history_type": 1, "history_user": "https://ja.localwiki.org/api/v4/users/3242/", "history_user_ip": "108.245.190.192" }, { "url": "https://ja.localwiki.org/api/v4/pages_history/1399284/", "name": "Helen Tanner Brodt", "slug": "helen tanner brodt", "content": "<p>\n\t<span class=\"image_frame image_frame_border image_right\"><img src=\"_files/NPS.jpg\" style=\"width: 300px; height: 375px;\"><span style=\"width: 300px;\" class=\"image_caption\">self portrait <sup>1</sup></span></span></p>\n<p>\n\t<strong>Helen Alice Tanner Brodt</strong> (April 21, 1838 \u2013 March 10, 1909) was an artist of some note, and the namesake of <a href=\"https://www.nps.gov/places/lake_helen.htm\">Lake Helen</a> in Lassen Volcanic National Park. She's said to be the first white woman to climb the Mt. Lassen peak, and following the climb, expedition leader Major Pierson B. Reading named the lake for her. She also taught art in the Oakland schools; her husband was educator <a href=\"A.W.%20Brodt\">Aurelius W. (\"A.W.\") Brodt</a>. <sup>1</sup></p>\n<h3>\n\tArt career</h3>\n<p>\n\t<span class=\"image_frame image_frame_border image_right\"><img src=\"_files/Mount_Shasta_viewed_through_trees_Helen_Tanner_Brodt.jpg\" style=\"width: 239px; height: 300px;\"><span style=\"width: 239px;\" class=\"image_caption\">pastels; Mt. Shasta through the trees by Helen Tanner Brodt<br>\n\tfrom UC Berkeley Bancroft Library</span></span></p>\n<p>\n\tTanner Brodt attended the National Academy of Design in New York City. After moving to Oakland, in 1867, she became the first art instructor of noted artist <a href=\"Arthur%20F.%20Mathews\">Arthur F. Mathews</a>. <sup>1</sup> Mathews was the brother of architect <a href=\"Walter%20J.%20Mathews\">Walter J. Mathews</a>.</p>\n<p>\n\tWhile she produced some landscapes, Tanner Brodt was best known for painting portraits. Several of her paintings and drawings are owned by the UC Berkeley Bancroft Library. The <a href=\"Oakland%20Museum%20of%20California\">Oakland Museum of California</a> also has some of her art supplies, a watercolor tray and a box of pastels. <sup>3</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tOne of Tanner Brodt's better-known portraits was of abolitionist <a href=\"https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Brown_(abolitionist)\">John Brown</a>, which was painted in 1864 (apparently based on a well-known daguerreotype), under the supervision of Mrs. Brown. <sup>5</sup> The painting was given to Storer College at Harper's Ferry, and may be hanging in the Harper's Ferry National Historical Park. <sup>5</sup> Another source says it's in the collection of the Smithsonian. <sup>6</sup> (See also <a href=\"https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-1-4039-7846-2_4\">John Brown, Bearded Patriarch</a> which says there was both an oil painting and a painting on a ceramic or metal plate.)</p>\n<p>\n\tKnown portraits include:</p>\n<ul>\n\t<li>\n\t\tself portrait</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\tAurelius W. Brodt</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Brown_(abolitionist)\">John Brown</a>, abolitionist</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lillie_Langtry\">Lillie Langtree</a>, actress</li>\n</ul>\n<p>\n\tHer portrait of the \"Jersey Lily\", Lillie Langtree, is said to have hung in <a href=\"https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roy_Bean\">Judge Roy Bean's</a> courthouse saloon, The Jersey Lilly. <sup>7</sup></p>\n<h3>\n\tFamily</h3>\n<p>\n\tHelen Tanner was born in Elmira, New York, in 1838 to Joshua and Sarah Tanner. After attending the National Academy of Design in New York City, she married A.W. Brodt in 1861, and they moved west to Red Bluff, California, in 1863. In August 1864, they were camping near Mt. Lassen when Major Reading's party spotted the smoke of their campfire. He invited them to join their climbing expedition, and on August 28, 1864, she became the first white woman to summit Mt. Lassen. <sup>1,2</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tHelen and A.W. had four children: daughter <strong>Ethel Brodt</strong> (1865 \u2013 1947), son <strong>Paul W. Brodt</strong> (1868 \u2013 1946), daughter <strong>Wyntie Bogardus Brodt</strong> (1875 \u2013 1963), and son <strong>Shirley M. Brodt</strong> (1876 \u2013 1899). Ethel and Paul were born in Tehama County; Wyntie and Shirley were born in Oakland.</p>\n<h3>\n\tDeath and Burial</h3>\n<p>\n\tTanner Brodt died in Berkeley in 1909. After a funeral at the First Christian Church of Berkeley, her remains were interred at \"The Hights\". <sup>4</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tThe Brodt's son Shirley was also interred there following his death in 1899.</p>\n<h3>\n\tShirley's Death</h3>\n<p>\n\tThe Brodt's youngest son, Shirley, died in 1899 under somewhat mysterious circumstances. He was 23 years old, and working for his father at the Ralston Health Food Company.</p>\n<p>\n\tOn November 19, 1899, Shirley fell from the roof of the family house, breaking his neck or back. A neighbor, W.H. Weilbye was passing by at the time and saw Shirley's body in midair. Death was not instantaneous and a doctor was summoned, but Shirley died within an hour.</p>\n<p>\n\tThe <em>San Francisco Chronicle</em> had the headline \"Plunged Madly To His Death\" with the subhead \"Circumstances indicate that it was a deliberate suicide\", noting <em>\"Members of the family refuse to express an opinion as to whether the fall was due to accident or intent but some circumstances point strongly to suicide.\"</em> The article described Shirley as <em>\"morose and rather eccentric.\"</em> <sup>8</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tThe <em>Sacramento Record-Union</em> went with \"Broke His Neck\" and \"An Oakland Man Throws Himself From a Roof.\" The article said Shirley was <em>\"Stricken with grief over the waning of his mental faculties.\"</em> <sup>9</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tThe <em>Oakland Tribune</em> had \"Shirley Brodt Takes His Life\" and \"Dived From a Third Story Window and Broke His Neck.\" His father noted that he had been behaving strangely for a month. The article posits that \"Young Brodt was evidently out his mind,\" and said W.H. Weilbye described <em>\"the awful jump as closely resembling a high dive made by a good swimmer.\"</em> <sup>10</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tDespite these colorful descriptions and headlines suggesting it was suicide, the next day the coroner ruled the fall was accidental. <sup>11</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tA funeral was held at the family home, and Shirley's remains were interred at \"The Hights\", <a href=\"Joaquin%20Miller\">Joaquin Miller's</a> estate where <a href=\"Joaquin%20Miller%20Park\">Joaquin Miller Park</a> is now. Miller was good friends with the Brodt family, and suggested the location. <sup>12</sup></p>\n<h2>\n\tLinks and References</h2>\n<ol>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.nps.gov/people/tanner-brodt.htm\">Helen Tanner Brodt</a> nps.gov</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://books.google.com/books?id=CXjPAAAAMAAJ&amp;lpg=PA488&amp;dq=a%20woman%20pioneer%20on%20lassen%20peak%20overland%20monthly&amp;pg=PA488#v=onepage&amp;q&amp;f=false\">A Woman Pioneer on Lassen's Peak</a> <em>Overland Monthly and Out West Magazine</em> November 1924</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"http://collections.museumca.org/?q=collection-item/a65173381\">watercolors A65.173.38.1</a>, <a href=\"http://collections.museumca.org/?q=collection-item/a65173382\">pastels A65.173.38.2</a> Gift of Virginia Perry Wilson, Oakland Museum of California</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.newspapers.com/clip/81984555/helen-tanner-brodt-funeral-interment/\">Aged Artist Buried Among Many Flowers</a> <em>Oakland Tribune</em> March 12, 1908</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.newspapers.com/clip/81986844/helen-tanner-brodt/\">Not in Napa Library</a> <em>Sacramento Bee</em> January 28, 1933</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"http://www.saratogahistory.com/History/sarah_brown.htm\">Sarah Brown, Artist and Abolitionist</a> Saratoga Historical Foundation</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://napavalleyregister.com/lifestyles/real-napa/columnists/rebecca-yerger/rebecca-yerger-memory-lane-the-women-of-wilson-s-inn/article_4d568a9d-9fcf-5486-b227-73b5f2d462a9.html\">Rebecca Yerger, Memory Lane: The Women of Wilson\u2019s Inn</a> <em>Napa Valley Register</em> March 24, 2019</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.newspapers.com/clip/81989745/shirley-brodt-suicide/\">Plunged Madly To His Death</a> <em>San Francisco Chronicle</em> November 20, 1899</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.newspapers.com/clip/82056681/shirley-brodt-throws-himself-from-a/\">Broke His Neck</a> <em>Sacramento Record-Union</em> November 20, 1899</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.newspapers.com/clip/82068795/shirley-brodt-takes-his-life/\">Shirley Brodt Takes His Life</a> <em>Oakland Tribune</em> November 20, 1899</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.newspapers.com/clip/81988831/shirley-brodts-death-from-fall/\">Shirley Brodt's Death Accidental</a> <em>Oakland Tribune</em> November 21, 1899</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.newspapers.com/clip/81988993/shirley-brodt-buried-on-the-heights/\">Buried On The Heights</a> <em>San Francisco Call</em> November 24, 1899</li>\n</ol>\n", "region": "https://ja.localwiki.org/api/v4/regions/340/", "history_comment": null, "history_date": "2021-07-23T23:44:45.245", "history_type": 1, "history_user": "https://ja.localwiki.org/api/v4/users/3242/", "history_user_ip": "108.245.190.192" }, { "url": "https://ja.localwiki.org/api/v4/pages_history/1399283/", "name": "Helen Tanner Brodt", "slug": "helen tanner brodt", "content": "<p>\n\t<span class=\"image_frame image_frame_border image_right\"><img src=\"_files/NPS.jpg\" style=\"width: 300px; height: 375px;\"><span style=\"width: 300px;\" class=\"image_caption\">self portrait <sup>1</sup></span></span></p>\n<p>\n\t<strong>Helen Alice Tanner Brodt</strong> (April 21, 1838 \u2013 March 10, 1909) was an artist of some note, and the namesake of <a href=\"https://www.nps.gov/places/lake_helen.htm\">Lake Helen</a> in Lassen Volcanic National Park. She's said to be the first white woman to climb the Mt. Lassen peak, and following the climb, expedition leader Major Pierson B. Reading named the lake for her. She also taught art in the Oakland schools; her husband was educator <a href=\"A.W.%20Brodt\">Aurelius W. (\"A.W.\") Brodt</a>. <sup>1</sup></p>\n<h3>\n\tArt career</h3>\n<p>\n\t<span class=\"image_frame image_frame_border image_right\"><img src=\"_files/Mount_Shasta_viewed_through_trees_Helen_Tanner_Brodt.jpg\" style=\"width: 239px; height: 300px;\"><span style=\"width: 239px;\" class=\"image_caption\">pastels; Mt. Shasta through the trees by Helen Tanner Brodt<br>\n\tfrom UC Berkeley Bancroft Library</span></span></p>\n<p>\n\tTanner Brodt attended the National Academy of Design in New York City. After moving to Oakland, in 1867, she became the first art instructor of noted artist <a href=\"Arthur%20F.%20Mathews\">Arthur F. Mathews</a>. <sup>1</sup> Mathews was the brother of architect <a href=\"Walter%20J.%20Mathews\">Walter J. Mathews</a>.</p>\n<p>\n\tWhile she produced some landscapes, Tanner Brodt was best known for painting portraits. Several of her paintings and drawings are owned by the UC Berkeley Bancroft Library. The <a href=\"Oakland%20Museum%20of%20California\">Oakland Museum of California</a> also has some her art supplies, a watercolor tray and a box of pastels. <sup>3</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tOne of Tanner Brodt's better-known portraits was of abolitionist <a href=\"https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Brown_(abolitionist)\">John Brown</a>, which was painted in 1864 (apparently based on a well-known daguerreotype), under the supervision of Mrs. Brown. <sup>5</sup> The painting was given to Storer College at Harper's Ferry, and may be hanging in the Harper's Ferry National Historical Park. <sup>5</sup> Another source says it's in the collection of the Smithsonian. <sup>6</sup> (See also <a href=\"https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-1-4039-7846-2_4\">John Brown, Bearded Patriarch</a> which says there was both an oil painting and a painting on a ceramic or metal plate.)</p>\n<p>\n\tKnown portraits include:</p>\n<ul>\n\t<li>\n\t\tself portrait</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\tAurelius W. Brodt</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Brown_(abolitionist)\">John Brown</a>, abolitionist</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lillie_Langtry\">Lillie Langtree</a>, actress</li>\n</ul>\n<p>\n\tHer portrait of the \"Jersey Lily\", Lillie Langtree, is said to have hung in <a href=\"https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roy_Bean\">Judge Roy Bean's</a> courthouse saloon, The Jersey Lilly. <sup>7</sup></p>\n<h3>\n\tFamily</h3>\n<p>\n\tHelen Tanner was born in Elmira, New York, in 1838 to Joshua and Sarah Tanner. After attending the National Academy of Design in New York City, she married A.W. Brodt in 1861, and they moved west to Red Bluff, California, in 1863. In August 1864, they were camping near Mt. Lassen when Major Reading's party spotted the smoke of their campfire. He invited them to join their climbing expedition, and on August 28, 1864, she became the first white woman to summit Mt. Lassen. <sup>1,2</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tHelen and A.W. had four children: daughter <strong>Ethel Brodt</strong> (1865 \u2013 1947), son <strong>Paul W. Brodt</strong> (1868 \u2013 1946), daughter <strong>Wyntie Bogardus Brodt</strong> (1875 \u2013 1963), and son <strong>Shirley M. Brodt</strong> (1876 \u2013 1899). Ethel and Paul were born in Tehama County; Wyntie and Shirley were born in Oakland.</p>\n<h3>\n\tDeath and Burial</h3>\n<p>\n\tTanner Brodt died in Berkeley in 1909. After a funeral at the First Christian Church of Berkeley, her remains were interred at \"The Hights\". <sup>4</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tThe Brodt's son Shirley was also interred there following his death in 1899.</p>\n<h3>\n\tShirley's Death</h3>\n<p>\n\tThe Brodt's youngest son, Shirley, died in 1899 under somewhat mysterious circumstances. He was 23 years old, and working for his father at the Ralston Health Food Company.</p>\n<p>\n\tOn November 19, 1899, Shirley fell from the roof of the family house, breaking his neck or back. A neighbor, W.H. Weilbye was passing by at the time and saw Shirley's body in midair. Death was not instantaneous and a doctor was summoned, but Shirley died within an hour.</p>\n<p>\n\tThe <em>San Francisco Chronicle</em> had the headline \"Plunged Madly To His Death\" with the subhead \"Circumstances indicate that it was a deliberate suicide\", noting <em>\"Members of the family refuse to express an opinion as to whether the fall was due to accident or intent but some circumstances point strongly to suicide.\"</em> The article described Shirley as <em>\"morose and rather eccentric.\"</em> <sup>8</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tThe <em>Sacramento Record-Union</em> went with \"Broke His Neck\" and \"An Oakland Man Throws Himself From a Roof.\" The article said Shirley was <em>\"Stricken with grief over the waning of his mental faculties.\"</em> <sup>9</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tThe <em>Oakland Tribune</em> had \"Shirley Brodt Takes His Life\" and \"Dived From a Third Story Window and Broke His Neck.\" His father noted that he had been behaving strangely for a month. The article posits that \"Young Brodt was evidently out his mind,\" and said W.H. Weilbye described <em>\"the awful jump as closely resembling a high dive made by a good swimmer.\"</em> <sup>10</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tDespite these colorful descriptions and headlines suggesting it was suicide, the next day the coroner ruled the fall was accidental. <sup>11</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tA funeral was held at the family home, and Shirley's remains were interred at \"The Hights\", <a href=\"Joaquin%20Miller\">Joaquin Miller's</a> estate where <a href=\"Joaquin%20Miller%20Park\">Joaquin Miller Park</a> is now. Miller was good friends with the Brodt family, and suggested the location. <sup>12</sup></p>\n<h2>\n\tLinks and References</h2>\n<ol>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.nps.gov/people/tanner-brodt.htm\">Helen Tanner Brodt</a> nps.gov</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://books.google.com/books?id=CXjPAAAAMAAJ&amp;lpg=PA488&amp;dq=a%20woman%20pioneer%20on%20lassen%20peak%20overland%20monthly&amp;pg=PA488#v=onepage&amp;q&amp;f=false\">A Woman Pioneer on Lassen's Peak</a> <em>Overland Monthly and Out West Magazine</em> November 1924</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"http://collections.museumca.org/?q=collection-item/a65173381\">watercolors A65.173.38.1</a>, <a href=\"http://collections.museumca.org/?q=collection-item/a65173382\">pastels A65.173.38.2</a> Gift of Virginia Perry Wilson, Oakland Museum of California</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.newspapers.com/clip/81984555/helen-tanner-brodt-funeral-interment/\">Aged Artist Buried Among Many Flowers</a> <em>Oakland Tribune</em> March 12, 1908</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.newspapers.com/clip/81986844/helen-tanner-brodt/\">Not in Napa Library</a> <em>Sacramento Bee</em> January 28, 1933</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"http://www.saratogahistory.com/History/sarah_brown.htm\">Sarah Brown, Artist and Abolitionist</a> Saratoga Historical Foundation</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://napavalleyregister.com/lifestyles/real-napa/columnists/rebecca-yerger/rebecca-yerger-memory-lane-the-women-of-wilson-s-inn/article_4d568a9d-9fcf-5486-b227-73b5f2d462a9.html\">Rebecca Yerger, Memory Lane: The Women of Wilson\u2019s Inn</a> <em>Napa Valley Register</em> March 24, 2019</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.newspapers.com/clip/81989745/shirley-brodt-suicide/\">Plunged Madly To His Death</a> <em>San Francisco Chronicle</em> November 20, 1899</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.newspapers.com/clip/82056681/shirley-brodt-throws-himself-from-a/\">Broke His Neck</a> <em>Sacramento Record-Union</em> November 20, 1899</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.newspapers.com/clip/82068795/shirley-brodt-takes-his-life/\">Shirley Brodt Takes His Life</a> <em>Oakland Tribune</em> November 20, 1899</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.newspapers.com/clip/81988831/shirley-brodts-death-from-fall/\">Shirley Brodt's Death Accidental</a> <em>Oakland Tribune</em> November 21, 1899</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.newspapers.com/clip/81988993/shirley-brodt-buried-on-the-heights/\">Buried On The Heights</a> <em>San Francisco Call</em> November 24, 1899</li>\n</ol>\n", "region": "https://ja.localwiki.org/api/v4/regions/340/", "history_comment": null, "history_date": "2021-07-23T23:14:22.626", "history_type": 1, "history_user": "https://ja.localwiki.org/api/v4/users/3242/", "history_user_ip": "108.245.190.192" }, { "url": "https://ja.localwiki.org/api/v4/pages_history/1399282/", "name": "Helen Tanner Brodt", "slug": "helen tanner brodt", "content": "<p>\n\t<span class=\"image_frame image_frame_border image_right\"><img src=\"_files/NPS.jpg\" style=\"width: 300px; height: 375px;\"><span style=\"width: 300px;\" class=\"image_caption\">self portrait <sup>1</sup></span></span></p>\n<p>\n\t<strong>Helen Alice Tanner Brodt</strong> (April 21, 1838 \u2013 March 10, 1909) was an artist of some note, and the namesake of Lake Helen in Lassen Volcanic National Park. She's said to be the first white woman to climb the Mt. Lassen peak, and following the climb, expedition leader Major Pierson B. Reading named the lake for her. She also taught art in the Oakland schools; her husband was educator <a href=\"A.W.%20Brodt\">Aurelius W. (\"A.W.\") Brodt</a>. <sup>1</sup></p>\n<h3>\n\tArt career</h3>\n<p>\n\t<span class=\"image_frame image_frame_border image_right\"><img src=\"_files/Mount_Shasta_viewed_through_trees_Helen_Tanner_Brodt.jpg\" style=\"width: 239px; height: 300px;\"><span style=\"width: 239px;\" class=\"image_caption\">pastels; Mt. Shasta through the trees by Helen Tanner Brodt<br>\n\tfrom UC Berkeley Bancroft Library</span></span></p>\n<p>\n\tTanner Brodt attended the National Academy of Design in New York City. After moving to Oakland, in 1867, she became the first art instructor of noted artist <a href=\"Arthur%20F.%20Mathews\">Arthur F. Mathews</a>. <sup>1</sup> Mathews was the brother of architect <a href=\"Walter%20J.%20Mathews\">Walter J. Mathews</a>.</p>\n<p>\n\tWhile she produced some landscapes, Tanner Brodt was best known for painting portraits. Several of her paintings and drawings are owned by the UC Berkeley Bancroft Library. The <a href=\"Oakland%20Museum%20of%20California\">Oakland Museum of California</a> also has some her art supplies, a watercolor tray and a box of pastels. <sup>3</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tOne of Tanner Brodt's better-known portraits was of abolitionist <a href=\"https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Brown_(abolitionist)\">John Brown</a>, which was painted in 1864 (apparently based on a well-known daguerreotype), under the supervision of Mrs. Brown. <sup>5</sup> The painting was given to Storer College at Harper's Ferry, and may be hanging in the Harper's Ferry National Historical Park. <sup>5</sup> Another source says it's in the collection of the Smithsonian. <sup>6</sup> (See also <a href=\"https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-1-4039-7846-2_4\">John Brown, Bearded Patriarch</a> which says there was both an oil painting and a painting on a ceramic or metal plate.)</p>\n<p>\n\tKnown portraits include:</p>\n<ul>\n\t<li>\n\t\tself portrait</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\tAurelius W. Brodt</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Brown_(abolitionist)\">John Brown</a>, abolitionist</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lillie_Langtry\">Lillie Langtree</a>, actress</li>\n</ul>\n<p>\n\tHer portrait of the \"Jersey Lily\", Lillie Langtree, is said to have hung in <a href=\"https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roy_Bean\">Judge Roy Bean's</a> courthouse saloon, The Jersey Lilly. <sup>7</sup></p>\n<h3>\n\tFamily</h3>\n<p>\n\tHelen Tanner was born in Elmira, New York, in 1838 to Joshua and Sarah Tanner. After attending the National Academy of Design in New York City, she married A.W. Brodt in 1861, and they moved west to Red Bluff, California, in 1863. In August 1864, they were camping near Mt. Lassen when Major Reading's party spotted the smoke of their campfire. He invited them to join their climbing expedition, and on August 28, 1864, she became the first white woman to summit Mt. Lassen. <sup>1,2</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tHelen and A.W. had four children: daughter <strong>Ethel Brodt</strong> (1865 \u2013 1947), son <strong>Paul W. Brodt</strong> (1868 \u2013 1946), daughter <strong>Wyntie Bogardus Brodt</strong> (1875 \u2013 1963), and son <strong>Shirley M. Brodt</strong> (1876 \u2013 1899). Ethel and Paul were born in Tehama County; Wyntie and Shirley were born in Oakland.</p>\n<h3>\n\tDeath and Burial</h3>\n<p>\n\tTanner Brodt died in Berkeley in 1909. After a funeral at the First Christian Church of Berkeley, her remains were interred at \"The Hights\". <sup>4</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tThe Brodt's son Shirley was also interred there following his death in 1899.</p>\n<h3>\n\tShirley's Death</h3>\n<p>\n\tThe Brodt's youngest son, Shirley, died in 1899 under somewhat mysterious circumstances. He was 23 years old, and working for his father at the Ralston Health Food Company.</p>\n<p>\n\tOn November 19, 1899, Shirley fell from the roof of the family house, breaking his neck or back. A neighbor, W.H. Weilbye was passing by at the time and saw Shirley's body in midair. Death was not instantaneous and a doctor was summoned, but Shirley died within an hour.</p>\n<p>\n\tThe <em>San Francisco Chronicle</em> had the headline \"Plunged Madly To His Death\" with the subhead \"Circumstances indicate that it was a deliberate suicide\", noting <em>\"Members of the family refuse to express an opinion as to whether the fall was due to accident or intent but some circumstances point strongly to suicide.\"</em> The article described Shirley as <em>\"morose and rather eccentric.\"</em> <sup>8</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tThe <em>Sacramento Record-Union</em> went with \"Broke His Neck\" and \"An Oakland Man Throws Himself From a Roof.\" The article said Shirley was <em>\"Stricken with grief over the waning of his mental faculties.\"</em> <sup>9</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tThe <em>Oakland Tribune</em> had \"Shirley Brodt Takes His Life\" and \"Dived From a Third Story Window and Broke His Neck.\" His father noted that he had been behaving strangely for a month. The article posits that \"Young Brodt was evidently out his mind,\" and said W.H. Weilbye described <em>\"the awful jump as closely resembling a high dive made by a good swimmer.\"</em> <sup>10</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tDespite these colorful descriptions and headlines suggesting it was suicide, the next day the coroner ruled the fall was accidental. <sup>11</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tA funeral was held at the family home, and Shirley's remains were interred at \"The Hights\", <a href=\"Joaquin%20Miller\">Joaquin Miller's</a> estate where <a href=\"Joaquin%20Miller%20Park\">Joaquin Miller Park</a> is now. Miller was good friends with the Brodt family, and suggested the location. <sup>12</sup></p>\n<h2>\n\tLinks and References</h2>\n<ol>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.nps.gov/people/tanner-brodt.htm\">Helen Tanner Brodt</a> nps.gov</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://books.google.com/books?id=CXjPAAAAMAAJ&amp;lpg=PA488&amp;dq=a%20woman%20pioneer%20on%20lassen%20peak%20overland%20monthly&amp;pg=PA488#v=onepage&amp;q&amp;f=false\">A Woman Pioneer on Lassen's Peak</a> <em>Overland Monthly and Out West Magazine</em> November 1924</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"http://collections.museumca.org/?q=collection-item/a65173381\">watercolors A65.173.38.1</a>, <a href=\"http://collections.museumca.org/?q=collection-item/a65173382\">pastels A65.173.38.2</a> Gift of Virginia Perry Wilson, Oakland Museum of California</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.newspapers.com/clip/81984555/helen-tanner-brodt-funeral-interment/\">Aged Artist Buried Among Many Flowers</a> <em>Oakland Tribune</em> March 12, 1908</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.newspapers.com/clip/81986844/helen-tanner-brodt/\">Not in Napa Library</a> <em>Sacramento Bee</em> January 28, 1933</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"http://www.saratogahistory.com/History/sarah_brown.htm\">Sarah Brown, Artist and Abolitionist</a> Saratoga Historical Foundation</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://napavalleyregister.com/lifestyles/real-napa/columnists/rebecca-yerger/rebecca-yerger-memory-lane-the-women-of-wilson-s-inn/article_4d568a9d-9fcf-5486-b227-73b5f2d462a9.html\">Rebecca Yerger, Memory Lane: The Women of Wilson\u2019s Inn</a> <em>Napa Valley Register</em> March 24, 2019</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.newspapers.com/clip/81989745/shirley-brodt-suicide/\">Plunged Madly To His Death</a> <em>San Francisco Chronicle</em> November 20, 1899</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.newspapers.com/clip/82056681/shirley-brodt-throws-himself-from-a/\">Broke His Neck</a> <em>Sacramento Record-Union</em> November 20, 1899</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.newspapers.com/clip/82068795/shirley-brodt-takes-his-life/\">Shirley Brodt Takes His Life</a> <em>Oakland Tribune</em> November 20, 1899</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.newspapers.com/clip/81988831/shirley-brodts-death-from-fall/\">Shirley Brodt's Death Accidental</a> <em>Oakland Tribune</em> November 21, 1899</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.newspapers.com/clip/81988993/shirley-brodt-buried-on-the-heights/\">Buried On The Heights</a> <em>San Francisco Call</em> November 24, 1899</li>\n</ol>\n", "region": "https://ja.localwiki.org/api/v4/regions/340/", "history_comment": null, "history_date": "2021-07-23T23:10:15.376", "history_type": 1, "history_user": "https://ja.localwiki.org/api/v4/users/3242/", "history_user_ip": "108.245.190.192" }, { "url": "https://ja.localwiki.org/api/v4/pages_history/1399281/", "name": "Helen Tanner Brodt", "slug": "helen tanner brodt", "content": "<p>\n\t<span class=\"image_frame image_frame_border image_right\"><img src=\"_files/NPS.jpg\" style=\"width: 300px; height: 375px;\"><span style=\"width: 300px;\" class=\"image_caption\">self portrait <sup>1</sup></span></span></p>\n<p>\n\t<strong>Helen Alice Tanner Brodt</strong> (April 21, 1838 \u2013 March 10, 1909) was an artist of some note, and the namesake of Lake Helen in Lassen Volcanic National Park. She's said to be the first white woman to climb the Mt. Lassen peak, and following the climb, expedition leader Major Pierson B. Reading named the lake for her. She also taught art in the Oakland schools; her husband was educator <a href=\"A.W.%20Brodt\">Aurelius W. (\"A.W.\") Brodt</a>. <sup>1</sup></p>\n<h3>\n\tArt career</h3>\n<p>\n\t<span class=\"image_frame image_frame_border image_right\"><img src=\"_files/Mount_Shasta_viewed_through_trees_Helen_Tanner_Brodt.jpg\" style=\"width: 239px; height: 300px;\"><span style=\"width: 239px;\" class=\"image_caption\">pastels; Mt. Shasta through the trees by Helen Tanner Brodt<br>\n\tfrom UC Berkeley Bancroft Library</span></span></p>\n<p>\n\tTanner Brodt attended the National Academy of Design in New York City. After moving to Oakland, in 1867, she became the first art instructor of noted artist <a href=\"Arthur%20F.%20Mathews\">Arthur F. Mathews</a>. <sup>1</sup> Mathews was the brother of architect <a href=\"Walter%20J.%20Mathews\">Walter J. Mathews</a>.</p>\n<p>\n\tWhile she produced some landscapes, Tanner Brodt was best known for painting portraits. Several of her paintings and drawings are owned by the UC Berkeley Bancroft Library. The <a href=\"Oakland%20Museum%20of%20California\">Oakland Museum of California</a> also has some her art supplies, a watercolor tray and a box of pastels. <sup>3</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tOne of Tanner Brodt's better-known portraits was of abolitionist <a href=\"https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Brown_(abolitionist)\">John Brown</a>, which was painted in 1864 (apparently based on a well-known daguerreotype), under the supervision of Mrs. Brown. <sup>5</sup> The painting was given to Storer College at Harper's Ferry, and may be hanging in the Harper's Ferry National Historical Park. <sup>5</sup> Another source says it's in the collection of the Smithsonian. <sup>6</sup> (See also <a href=\"https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-1-4039-7846-2_4\">John Brown, Bearded Patriarch</a> which says there was both an oil painting and a painting on a ceramic or metal plate.)</p>\n<p>\n\tKnown portraits include:</p>\n<ul>\n\t<li>\n\t\tself portrait</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\tAurelius W. Brodt</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Brown_(abolitionist)\">John Brown</a>, abolitionist</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lillie_Langtry\">Lillie Langtree</a>, actress</li>\n</ul>\n<p>\n\tHer portrait of the \"Jersey Lily\", Lillie Langtree, is said to have hung in <a href=\"https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roy_Bean\">Judge Roy Bean's</a> courthouse saloon, The Jersey Lilly. <sup>7</sup></p>\n<h3>\n\tFamily</h3>\n<p>\n\tHelen Tanner was born in Elmira, New York, in 1838 to Joshua and Sarah Tanner. After attending the National Academy of Design in New York City, she married A.W. Brodt in 1861, and they moved west to Red Bluff, California, in 1863. In August 1864, they were camping near Mt. Lassen when Major Reading's party spotted the smoke of their campfire. He invited them to join their climbing expedition, and on August 28, 1864, she became the first white woman to summit Mt. Lassen. <sup>1,2</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tHelen and A.W. had four children: daughter <strong>Ethel Brodt</strong> (1865 \u2013 1947), son <strong>Paul W. Brodt</strong> (1868 \u2013 1946), daughter <strong>Wyntie Bogardus Brodt</strong> (1875 \u2013 1963), and son <strong>Shirley M. Brodt</strong> (1876 \u2013 1899). Ethel and Paul were born in Tehama County; Wyntie and Shirley were born in Oakland.</p>\n<h3>\n\tDeath and Burial</h3>\n<p>\n\tTanner Brodt died in Berkeley in 1909. After a funeral at the First Christian Church of Berkeley, her remains were interred at \"The Hights\". <sup>4</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tThe Brodt's son Shirley was also interred there following his death in 1899.</p>\n<h3>\n\tShirley's Death</h3>\n<p>\n\tThe Brodt's youngest son, Shirley, died in 1899 under somewhat mysterious circumstances. He was 23 years old, and working for his father at the Ralston Health Food Company.</p>\n<p>\n\tOn November 19, 1899, Shirley fell from the roof of the family house, breaking his neck or back. A neighbor, W.H. Weilbye was passing by at the time and saw Shirley's body in midair. Death was not instantaneous and a doctor was summoned, but Shirley died within an hour.</p>\n<p>\n\tThe <em>San Francisco Chronicle</em> had the headline \"Plunged Madly To His Death\" with the subhead \"Circumstances indicate that it was a deliberate suicide\", noting <em>\"Members of the family refuse to press an opinion as to whether the fall was due to accident or intent but some circumstances point strongly to suicide.\"</em> The article described Shirley as <em>\"morose and rather eccentric.\"</em> <sup>8</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tThe <em>Sacramento Record-Union</em> went with \"Broke His Neck\" and \"An Oakland Man Throws Himself From a Roof.\" The article said Shirley was <em>\"Stricken with grief over the waning of his mental faculties.\"</em> <sup>9</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tThe <em>Oakland Tribune</em> had \"Shirley Brodt Takes His Life\" and \"Dived From a Third Story Window and Broke His Neck.\" His father noted that he had been behaving strangely for a month. The article posits that \"Young Brodt was evidently out his mind,\" and said W.H. Weilbye described <em>\"the awful jump as closely resembling a high dive made by a good swimmer.\"</em> <sup>10</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tDespite these colorful descriptions and headlines suggesting it was suicide, the next day the coroner ruled the fall was accidental. <sup>11</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tA funeral was held at the family home, and Shirley's remains were interred at \"The Hights\", <a href=\"Joaquin%20Miller\">Joaquin Miller's</a> estate where <a href=\"Joaquin%20Miller%20Park\">Joaquin Miller Park</a> is now. Miller was good friends with the Brodt family, and suggested the location. <sup>12</sup></p>\n<h2>\n\tLinks and References</h2>\n<ol>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.nps.gov/people/tanner-brodt.htm\">Helen Tanner Brodt</a> nps.gov</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://books.google.com/books?id=CXjPAAAAMAAJ&amp;lpg=PA488&amp;dq=a%20woman%20pioneer%20on%20lassen%20peak%20overland%20monthly&amp;pg=PA488#v=onepage&amp;q&amp;f=false\">A Woman Pioneer on Lassen's Peak</a> <em>Overland Monthly and Out West Magazine</em> November 1924</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"http://collections.museumca.org/?q=collection-item/a65173381\">watercolors A65.173.38.1</a>, <a href=\"http://collections.museumca.org/?q=collection-item/a65173382\">pastels A65.173.38.2</a> Gift of Virginia Perry Wilson, Oakland Museum of California</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.newspapers.com/clip/81984555/helen-tanner-brodt-funeral-interment/\">Aged Artist Buried Among Many Flowers</a> <em>Oakland Tribune</em> March 12, 1908</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.newspapers.com/clip/81986844/helen-tanner-brodt/\">Not in Napa Library</a> <em>Sacramento Bee</em> January 28, 1933</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"http://www.saratogahistory.com/History/sarah_brown.htm\">Sarah Brown, Artist and Abolitionist</a> Saratoga Historical Foundation</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://napavalleyregister.com/lifestyles/real-napa/columnists/rebecca-yerger/rebecca-yerger-memory-lane-the-women-of-wilson-s-inn/article_4d568a9d-9fcf-5486-b227-73b5f2d462a9.html\">Rebecca Yerger, Memory Lane: The Women of Wilson\u2019s Inn</a> <em>Napa Valley Register</em> March 24, 2019</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.newspapers.com/clip/81989745/shirley-brodt-suicide/\">Plunged Madly To His Death</a> <em>San Francisco Chronicle</em> November 20, 1899</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.newspapers.com/clip/82056681/shirley-brodt-throws-himself-from-a/\">Broke His Neck</a> <em>Sacramento Record-Union</em> November 20, 1899</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.newspapers.com/clip/82068795/shirley-brodt-takes-his-life/\">Shirley Brodt Takes His Life</a> <em>Oakland Tribune</em> November 20, 1899</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.newspapers.com/clip/81988831/shirley-brodts-death-from-fall/\">Shirley Brodt's Death Accidental</a> <em>Oakland Tribune</em> November 21, 1899</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.newspapers.com/clip/81988993/shirley-brodt-buried-on-the-heights/\">Buried On The Heights</a> <em>San Francisco Call</em> November 24, 1899</li>\n</ol>\n", "region": "https://ja.localwiki.org/api/v4/regions/340/", "history_comment": null, "history_date": "2021-07-23T22:21:12.622", "history_type": 1, "history_user": "https://ja.localwiki.org/api/v4/users/3242/", "history_user_ip": "108.245.190.192" }, { "url": "https://ja.localwiki.org/api/v4/pages_history/1399280/", "name": "Helen Tanner Brodt", "slug": "helen tanner brodt", "content": "<p>\n\t<span class=\"image_frame image_frame_border image_right\"><img src=\"_files/NPS.jpg\" style=\"width: 300px; height: 375px;\"><span style=\"width: 300px;\" class=\"image_caption\">self portrait <sup>1</sup></span></span></p>\n<p>\n\t<strong>Helen Alice Tanner Brodt</strong> (April 21, 1838 \u2013 March 10, 1909) was an artist of some note, and the namesake of Lake Helen in Lassen Volcanic National Park. She's said to be the first white woman to climb the Mt. Lassen peak, and following the climb, expedition leader Major Pierson B. Reading named the lake for her. She also taught art in the Oakland schools; her husband was educator <a href=\"A.W.%20Brodt\">Aurelius W. (\"A.W.\") Brodt</a>. <sup>1</sup></p>\n<h3>\n\tArt career</h3>\n<p>\n\t<span class=\"image_frame image_frame_border image_right\"><img src=\"_files/Mount_Shasta_viewed_through_trees_Helen_Tanner_Brodt.jpg\" style=\"width: 239px; height: 300px;\"><span style=\"width: 239px;\" class=\"image_caption\">pastels; Mt. Shasta through the trees by Helen Tanner Brodt<br>\n\tfrom UC Berkeley Bancroft Library</span></span></p>\n<p>\n\tTanner Brodt attended the National Academy of Design in New York City. After moving to Oakland, in 1867, she became the first art instructor of noted artist <a href=\"Arthur%20F.%20Mathews\">Arthur F. Mathews</a>. <sup>1</sup> Mathews was the brother of architect <a href=\"Walter%20J.%20Mathews\">Walter J. Mathews</a>.</p>\n<p>\n\tWhile she produced some landscapes, Tanner Brodt was best known for painting portraits. Several of her paintings and drawings are owned by the UC Berkeley Bancroft Library. The <a href=\"Oakland%20Museum%20of%20California\">Oakland Museum of California</a> also has some her art supplies, a watercolor tray and a box of pastels. <sup>3</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tOne of Tanner Brodt's better-known portraits was of abolitionist <a href=\"https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Brown_(abolitionist)\">John Brown</a>, which was painted in 1864 (apparently based on a well-known daguerreotype), under the supervision of Mrs. Brown. <sup>5</sup> The painting was given to Storer College at Harper's Ferry, and may be hanging in the Harper's Ferry National Historical Park. <sup>5</sup> Another source says it's in the collection of the Smithsonian. <sup>6</sup> (See also <a href=\"https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-1-4039-7846-2_4\">John Brown, Bearded Patriarch</a> which says there was both an oil painting and a painting on a ceramic or metal plate.)</p>\n<p>\n\tKnown portraits include:</p>\n<ul>\n\t<li>\n\t\tself portrait</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\tAurelius W. Brodt</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Brown_(abolitionist)\">John Brown</a>, abolitionist</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lillie_Langtry\">Lillie Langtree</a>, actress</li>\n</ul>\n<p>\n\tHer portrait of the \"Jersey Lily\", Lillie Langtree, is said to have hung in Judge Roy Bean's courthouse saloon, The Jersey Lilly. <sup>7</sup></p>\n<h3>\n\tFamily</h3>\n<p>\n\tHelen Tanner was born in Elmira, New York, in 1838 to Joshua and Sarah Tanner. After attending the National Academy of Design in New York City, she married A.W. Brodt in 1861, and they moved west to Red Bluff, California, in 1863. In August 1864, they were camping near Mt. Lassen when Major Reading's party spotted the smoke of their campfire. He invited them to join their climbing expedition, and on August 28, 1864, she became the first white woman to summit Mt. Lassen. <sup>1,2</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tHelen and A.W. had four children: daughter <strong>Ethel Brodt</strong> (1865 \u2013 1947), son <strong>Paul W. Brodt</strong> (1868 \u2013 1946), daughter <strong>Wyntie Bogardus Brodt</strong> (1875 \u2013 1963), and son <strong>Shirley M. Brodt</strong> (1876 \u2013 1899). Ethel and Paul were born in Tehama County; Wyntie and Shirley were born in Oakland.</p>\n<h3>\n\tDeath and Burial</h3>\n<p>\n\tTanner Brodt died in Berkeley in 1909. After a funeral at the First Christian Church of Berkeley, her remains were interred at \"The Hights\". <sup>4</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tThe Brodt's son Shirley was also interred there following his death in 1899.</p>\n<h3>\n\tShirley's Death</h3>\n<p>\n\tThe Brodt's youngest son, Shirley, died in 1899 under somewhat mysterious circumstances. He was 23 years old, and working for his father at the Ralston Health Food Company.</p>\n<p>\n\tOn November 19, 1899, Shirley fell from the roof of the family house, breaking his neck or back. A neighbor, W.H. Weilbye was passing by at the time and saw Shirley's body in midair. Death was not instantaneous and a doctor was summoned, but Shirley died within an hour.</p>\n<p>\n\tThe <em>San Francisco Chronicle</em> had the headline \"Plunged Madly To His Death\" with the subhead \"Circumstances indicate that it was a deliberate suicide\", noting <em>\"Members of the family refuse to press an opinion as to whether the fall was due to accident or intent but some circumstances point strongly to suicide.\"</em> The article described Shirley as <em>\"morose and rather eccentric.\"</em> <sup>8</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tThe <em>Sacramento Record-Union</em> went with \"Broke His Neck\" and \"An Oakland Man Throws Himself From a Roof.\" The article said Shirley was <em>\"Stricken with grief over the waning of his mental faculties.\"</em> <sup>9</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tThe <em>Oakland Tribune</em> had \"Shirley Brodt Takes His Life\" and \"Dived From a Third Story Window and Broke His Neck.\" His father noted that he had been behaving strangely for a month. The article posits that \"Young Brodt was evidently out his mind,\" and said W.H. Weilbye described <em>\"the awful jump as closely resembling a high dive made by a good swimmer.\"</em> <sup>10</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tDespite these colorful descriptions and headlines suggesting it was suicide, the next day the coroner ruled the fall was accidental. <sup>11</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tA funeral was held at the family home, and Shirley's remains were interred at \"The Hights\", <a href=\"Joaquin%20Miller\">Joaquin Miller's</a> estate where <a href=\"Joaquin%20Miller%20Park\">Joaquin Miller Park</a> is now. Miller was good friends with the Brodt family, and suggested the location. <sup>12</sup></p>\n<h2>\n\tLinks and References</h2>\n<ol>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.nps.gov/people/tanner-brodt.htm\">Helen Tanner Brodt</a> nps.gov</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://books.google.com/books?id=CXjPAAAAMAAJ&amp;lpg=PA488&amp;dq=a%20woman%20pioneer%20on%20lassen%20peak%20overland%20monthly&amp;pg=PA488#v=onepage&amp;q&amp;f=false\">A Woman Pioneer on Lassen's Peak</a> <em>Overland Monthly and Out West Magazine</em> November 1924</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"http://collections.museumca.org/?q=collection-item/a65173381\">watercolors A65.173.38.1</a>, <a href=\"http://collections.museumca.org/?q=collection-item/a65173382\">pastels A65.173.38.2</a> Gift of Virginia Perry Wilson, Oakland Museum of California</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.newspapers.com/clip/81984555/helen-tanner-brodt-funeral-interment/\">Aged Artist Buried Among Many Flowers</a> <em>Oakland Tribune</em> March 12, 1908</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.newspapers.com/clip/81986844/helen-tanner-brodt/\">Not in Napa Library</a> <em>Sacramento Bee</em> January 28, 1933</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"http://www.saratogahistory.com/History/sarah_brown.htm\">Sarah Brown, Artist and Abolitionist</a> Saratoga Historical Foundation</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://napavalleyregister.com/lifestyles/real-napa/columnists/rebecca-yerger/rebecca-yerger-memory-lane-the-women-of-wilson-s-inn/article_4d568a9d-9fcf-5486-b227-73b5f2d462a9.html\">Rebecca Yerger, Memory Lane: The Women of Wilson\u2019s Inn</a> <em>Napa Valley Register</em> March 24, 2019</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.newspapers.com/clip/81989745/shirley-brodt-suicide/\">Plunged Madly To His Death</a> <em>San Francisco Chronicle</em> November 20, 1899</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.newspapers.com/clip/82056681/shirley-brodt-throws-himself-from-a/\">Broke His Neck</a> <em>Sacramento Record-Union</em> November 20, 1899</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.newspapers.com/clip/82068795/shirley-brodt-takes-his-life/\">Shirley Brodt Takes His Life</a> <em>Oakland Tribune</em> November 20, 1899</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.newspapers.com/clip/81988831/shirley-brodts-death-from-fall/\">Shirley Brodt's Death Accidental</a> <em>Oakland Tribune</em> November 21, 1899</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.newspapers.com/clip/81988993/shirley-brodt-buried-on-the-heights/\">Buried On The Heights</a> <em>San Francisco Call</em> November 24, 1899</li>\n</ol>\n", "region": "https://ja.localwiki.org/api/v4/regions/340/", "history_comment": null, "history_date": "2021-07-23T22:17:21.797", "history_type": 1, "history_user": "https://ja.localwiki.org/api/v4/users/3242/", "history_user_ip": "108.245.190.192" }, { "url": "https://ja.localwiki.org/api/v4/pages_history/1399279/", "name": "Helen Tanner Brodt", "slug": "helen tanner brodt", "content": "<p>\n\t<span class=\"image_frame image_frame_border image_right\"><img src=\"_files/NPS.jpg\" style=\"width: 300px; height: 375px;\"><span style=\"width: 300px;\" class=\"image_caption\">self portrait <sup>1</sup></span></span></p>\n<p>\n\t<strong>Helen Alice Tanner Brodt</strong> (April 21, 1838 \u2013 March 10, 1909) was an artist of some note, and the namesake of Lake Helen in Lassen Volcanic National Park. She's said to be the first white woman to climb the Mt. Lassen peak, and following the climb, expedition leader Major Pierson B. Reading named the lake for her. She also taught art in the Oakland schools; her husband was educator <a href=\"A.W.%20Brodt\">Aurelius W. (\"A.W.\") Brodt</a>. <sup>1</sup></p>\n<h3>\n\tArt career</h3>\n<p>\n\t<span class=\"image_frame image_frame_border image_right\"><img src=\"_files/Mount_Shasta_viewed_through_trees_Helen_Tanner_Brodt.jpg\" style=\"width: 239px; height: 300px;\"><span style=\"width: 239px;\" class=\"image_caption\">pastels; Mt. Shasta through the trees by Helen Tanner Brodt<br>\n\tfrom UC Berkeley Bancroft Library</span></span></p>\n<p>\n\tTanner Brodt attended the National Academy of Design in New York City. After moving to Oakland, in 1867, she became the first art instructor of noted artist <a href=\"Arthur%20F.%20Mathews\">Arthur F. Mathews</a>. <sup>1</sup> Mathews was the brother of architect <a href=\"Walter%20J.%20Mathews\">Walter J. Mathews</a>.</p>\n<p>\n\tWhile she produced some landscapes, Tanner Brodt was best known for painting portraits. Several of her paintings and drawings are owned by the UC Berkeley Bancroft Library. The <a href=\"Oakland%20Museum%20of%20California\">Oakland Museum of California</a> also has some her art supplies, a watercolor tray and a box of pastels. <sup>3</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tOne of Tanner Brodt's better-known portraits was of abolitionist <a href=\"https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Brown_(abolitionist)\">John Brown</a>, which was painted in 1864 (apparently based on a well-known daguerreotype), under the supervision of Mrs. Brown. <sup>5</sup> The painting was given to Storer College at Harper's Ferry, and may be hanging in the Harper's Ferry National Historical Park. <sup>5</sup> Another source says it's in the collection of the Smithsonian. <sup>6</sup> (See also <a href=\"https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-1-4039-7846-2_4\">John Brown, Bearded Patriarch</a> which says there was both an oil painting and a painting on a ceramic or metal plate.)</p>\n<p>\n\tKnown portraits include:</p>\n<ul>\n\t<li>\n\t\tself portrait</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\tAurelius W. Brodt</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Brown_(abolitionist)\">John Brown</a>, abolitionist</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lillie_Langtry\">Lillie Langtree</a>, actress</li>\n</ul>\n<p>\n\tHer portrait of the \"Jersey Lily\", Lillie Langtree, is said to have hung in Judge Roy Bean's courthouse saloon, The Jersey Lilly. <sup>7</sup></p>\n<h3>\n\tFamily</h3>\n<p>\n\tHelen Tanner was born in Elmira, New York, in 1838 to Joshua and Sarah Tanner. After attending the National Academy of Design in New York City, she married A.W. Brodt in 1861, and they moved west to Red Bluff, California, in 1863. In August 1864, they were camping near Mt. Lassen when Major Reading's party spotted the smoke of their campfire. He invited them to join their climb, and on August 28, 1864, she became the first white woman to summit Mt. Lassen. <sup>1,2</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tHelen and A.W. had four children: daughter <strong>Ethel Brodt</strong> (1865 \u2013 1947), son <strong>Paul W. Brodt</strong> (1868 \u2013 1946), daughter <strong>Wyntie Bogardus Brodt</strong> (1875 \u2013 1963), and son <strong>Shirley M. Brodt</strong> (1876 \u2013 1899). Ethel and Paul were born in Tehama County; Wyntie and Shirley were born in Oakland.</p>\n<h3>\n\tDeath and Burial</h3>\n<p>\n\tTanner Brodt died in Berkeley in 1909. After a funeral at the First Christian Church of Berkeley, her remains were interred at \"The Hights\". <sup>4</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tThe Brodt's son Shirley was also interred there following his death in 1899.</p>\n<h3>\n\tShirley's Death</h3>\n<p>\n\tThe Brodt's youngest son, Shirley, died in 1899 under somewhat mysterious circumstances. He was 23 years old, and working for his father at the Ralston Health Food Company.</p>\n<p>\n\tOn November 19, 1899, Shirley fell from the roof of the family house, breaking his neck or back. A neighbor, W.H. Weilbye was passing by at the time and saw Shirley's body in midair. Death was not instantaneous and a doctor was summoned, but Shirley died within an hour.</p>\n<p>\n\tThe <em>San Francisco Chronicle</em> had the headline \"Plunged Madly To His Death\" with the subhead \"Circumstances indicate that it was a deliberate suicide\", noting <em>\"Members of the family refuse to press an opinion as to whether the fall was due to accident or intent but some circumstances point strongly to suicide.\"</em> The article described Shirley as <em>\"morose and rather eccentric.\"</em> <sup>8</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tThe <em>Sacramento Record-Union</em> went with \"Broke His Neck\" and \"An Oakland Man Throws Himself From a Roof.\" The article said Shirley was <em>\"Stricken with grief over the waning of his mental faculties.\"</em> <sup>9</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tThe <em>Oakland Tribune</em> had \"Shirley Brodt Takes His Life\" and \"Dived From a Third Story Window and Broke His Neck.\" His father noted that he had been behaving strangely for a month. The article posits that \"Young Brodt was evidently out his mind,\" and said W.H. Weilbye described <em>\"the awful jump as closely resembling a high dive made by a good swimmer.\"</em> <sup>10</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tDespite these colorful descriptions and headlines suggesting it was suicide, the next day the coroner ruled the fall was accidental. <sup>11</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tA funeral was held at the family home, and Shirley's remains were interred at \"The Hights\", <a href=\"Joaquin%20Miller\">Joaquin Miller's</a> estate where <a href=\"Joaquin%20Miller%20Park\">Joaquin Miller Park</a> is now. Miller was good friends with the Brodt family, and suggested the location. <sup>12</sup></p>\n<h2>\n\tLinks and References</h2>\n<ol>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.nps.gov/people/tanner-brodt.htm\">Helen Tanner Brodt</a> nps.gov</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://books.google.com/books?id=CXjPAAAAMAAJ&amp;lpg=PA488&amp;dq=a%20woman%20pioneer%20on%20lassen%20peak%20overland%20monthly&amp;pg=PA488#v=onepage&amp;q&amp;f=false\">A Woman Pioneer on Lassen's Peak</a> <em>Overland Monthly and Out West Magazine</em> November 1924</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"http://collections.museumca.org/?q=collection-item/a65173381\">watercolors A65.173.38.1</a>, <a href=\"http://collections.museumca.org/?q=collection-item/a65173382\">pastels A65.173.38.2</a> Gift of Virginia Perry Wilson, Oakland Museum of California</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.newspapers.com/clip/81984555/helen-tanner-brodt-funeral-interment/\">Aged Artist Buried Among Many Flowers</a> <em>Oakland Tribune</em> March 12, 1908</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.newspapers.com/clip/81986844/helen-tanner-brodt/\">Not in Napa Library</a> <em>Sacramento Bee</em> January 28, 1933</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"http://www.saratogahistory.com/History/sarah_brown.htm\">Sarah Brown, Artist and Abolitionist</a> Saratoga Historical Foundation</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://napavalleyregister.com/lifestyles/real-napa/columnists/rebecca-yerger/rebecca-yerger-memory-lane-the-women-of-wilson-s-inn/article_4d568a9d-9fcf-5486-b227-73b5f2d462a9.html\">Rebecca Yerger, Memory Lane: The Women of Wilson\u2019s Inn</a> <em>Napa Valley Register</em> March 24, 2019</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.newspapers.com/clip/81989745/shirley-brodt-suicide/\">Plunged Madly To His Death</a> <em>San Francisco Chronicle</em> November 20, 1899</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.newspapers.com/clip/82056681/shirley-brodt-throws-himself-from-a/\">Broke His Neck</a> <em>Sacramento Record-Union</em> November 20, 1899</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.newspapers.com/clip/82068795/shirley-brodt-takes-his-life/\">Shirley Brodt Takes His Life</a> <em>Oakland Tribune</em> November 20, 1899</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.newspapers.com/clip/81988831/shirley-brodts-death-from-fall/\">Shirley Brodt's Death Accidental</a> <em>Oakland Tribune</em> November 21, 1899</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.newspapers.com/clip/81988993/shirley-brodt-buried-on-the-heights/\">Buried On The Heights</a> <em>San Francisco Call</em> November 24, 1899</li>\n</ol>\n", "region": "https://ja.localwiki.org/api/v4/regions/340/", "history_comment": null, "history_date": "2021-07-23T22:14:39.571", "history_type": 1, "history_user": "https://ja.localwiki.org/api/v4/users/3242/", "history_user_ip": "108.245.190.192" }, { "url": "https://ja.localwiki.org/api/v4/pages_history/1399278/", "name": "Helen Tanner Brodt", "slug": "helen tanner brodt", "content": "<p>\n\t<span class=\"image_frame image_frame_border image_right\"><img src=\"_files/NPS.jpg\" style=\"width: 300px; height: 375px;\"><span style=\"width: 300px;\" class=\"image_caption\">self portrait <sup>1</sup></span></span></p>\n<p>\n\t<strong>Helen Alice Tanner Brodt</strong> (April 21, 1838 \u2013 March 10, 1909) was an artist of some note, and the namesake of Lake Helen in Lassen Volcanic National Park. She's said to be the first white woman to climb the Mt. Lassen peak, and following the climb, expedition leader Major Pierson B. Reading named the lake for her. She also taught art in the Oakland schools; her husband was educator <a href=\"A.W.%20Brodt\">Aurelius W. (\"A.W.\") Brodt</a>. <sup>1</sup></p>\n<h3>\n\tArt career</h3>\n<p>\n\t<span class=\"image_frame image_frame_border image_right\"><img src=\"_files/Mount_Shasta_viewed_through_trees_Helen_Tanner_Brodt.jpg\" style=\"width: 239px; height: 300px;\"><span style=\"width: 239px;\" class=\"image_caption\">pastels; Mt. Shasta through the trees by Helen Tanner Brodt<br>\n\tfrom UC Berkeley Bancroft Library</span></span></p>\n<p>\n\tTanner Brodt attended the National Academy of Design in New York City. After moving to Oakland, in 1867, she became the first art instructor of noted artist <a href=\"Arthur%20F.%20Mathews\">Arthur F. Mathews</a>. <sup>1</sup> Mathews was the brother of architect <a href=\"Walter%20J.%20Mathews\">Walter J. Mathews</a>.</p>\n<p>\n\tWhile she produced some landscapes, Tanner Brodt was best known for painting portraits. Several of her paintings and drawings are owned by the UC Berkeley Bancroft Library. The <a href=\"Oakland%20Museum%20of%20California\">Oakland Museum of California</a> also has some her art supplies, a watercolor tray and a box of pastels. <sup>3</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tOne of Tanner Brodt's better-known portraits was of abolitionist <a href=\"https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Brown_(abolitionist)\">John Brown</a>, which was painted in 1864 (apparently based on a well-known daguerreotype), under the supervision of Mrs. Brown. <sup>5</sup> The painting was given to Storer College at Harper's Ferry, and may be hanging in the Harper's Ferry National Historical Park. <sup>5</sup> Another source says it's in the collection of the Smithsonian. <sup>6</sup> (See also <a href=\"https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-1-4039-7846-2_4\">John Brown, Bearded Patriarch</a> which says there was both an oil painting and a painting on a ceramic or metal plate.)</p>\n<p>\n\tKnown portraits include:</p>\n<ul>\n\t<li>\n\t\tself portrait</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\tAurelius W. Brodt</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Brown_(abolitionist)\">John Brown</a>, abolitionist</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lillie_Langtry\">Lillie Langtree</a>, actress</li>\n</ul>\n<p>\n\tHer portrait of the \"Jersey Lily\", Lillie Langtree, is said to have hung in Judge Roy Bean's courthouse saloon, The Jersey Lilly. <sup>7</sup></p>\n<h3>\n\tFamily</h3>\n<p>\n\tHelen Tanner was born in Elmira, New York, in 1838 to Joshua and Sarah Tanner. After attending the National Academy of Design in New York City, she married A.W. Brodt in 1861, and they moved west to Red Bluff, California, in 1863. In August 1864, they were camping near Mt. Lassen when Major Reading's party spotted the smoke of their campfire. He invited them to join their climb, and on August 28, 1864, she became the first white woman to summit Mt. Lassen. <sup>1,2</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tHelen and A.W. had four children: daughter <strong>Ethel Brodt</strong> (1865 \u2013 1947), son <strong>Paul W. Brodt</strong> (1868 \u2013 1946), daughter <strong>Wyntie Bogardus Brodt</strong> (1875 \u2013 1963), and son <strong>Shirley M. Brodt</strong> (1876 \u2013 1899). Ethel and Paul were born in Tehama County; Wyntie and Shirley were born in Oakland.</p>\n<h3>\n\tDeath and Burial</h3>\n<p>\n\tTanner Brodt died in Berkeley in 1909. After a funeral at the First Christian Church of Berkeley, her remains were interred at \"The Hights\". <sup>4</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tThe Brodt's son Shirley was also interred there following his death in 1898.</p>\n<h3>\n\tShirley's Death</h3>\n<p>\n\tThe Brodt's youngest son, Shirley, died in 1899 under somewhat mysterious circumstances. He was 23 years old, and working for his father at the Ralston Health Food Company.</p>\n<p>\n\tOn November 19, 1899, Shirley fell from the roof of the family house, breaking his neck or back. A neighbor, W.H. Weilbye was passing by at the time and saw Shirley's body in midair. Death was not instantaneous and a doctor was summoned, but Shirley died within an hour.</p>\n<p>\n\tThe <em>San Francisco Chronicle</em> had the headline \"Plunged Madly To His Death\" with the subhead \"Circumstances indicate that it was a deliberate suicide\", noting <em>\"Members of the family refuse to press an opinion as to whether the fall was due to accident or intent but some circumstances point strongly to suicide.\"</em> The article described Shirley as <em>\"morose and rather eccentric.\"</em> <sup>8</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tThe <em>Sacramento Record-Union</em> went with \"Broke His Neck\" and \"An Oakland Man Throws Himself From a Roof.\" The article said Shirley was <em>\"Stricken with grief over the waning of his mental faculties.\"</em> <sup>9</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tThe <em>Oakland Tribune</em> had \"Shirley Brodt Takes His Life\" and \"Dived From a Third Story Window and Broke His Neck.\" His father noted that he had been behaving strangely for a month. The article posits that \"Young Brodt was evidently out his mind,\" and said W.H. Weilbye described <em>\"the awful jump as closely resembling a high dive made by a good swimmer.\"</em> <sup>10</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tDespite these colorful descriptions and headlines suggesting it was suicide, the next day the coroner ruled the fall was accidental. <sup>11</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tA funeral was held at the family home, and Shirley's remains were interred at \"The Hights\", <a href=\"Joaquin%20Miller\">Joaquin Miller's</a> estate where <a href=\"Joaquin%20Miller%20Park\">Joaquin Miller Park</a> is now. Miller was good friends with the Brodt family, and suggested the location. <sup>12</sup></p>\n<h2>\n\tLinks and References</h2>\n<ol>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.nps.gov/people/tanner-brodt.htm\">Helen Tanner Brodt</a> nps.gov</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://books.google.com/books?id=CXjPAAAAMAAJ&amp;lpg=PA488&amp;dq=a%20woman%20pioneer%20on%20lassen%20peak%20overland%20monthly&amp;pg=PA488#v=onepage&amp;q&amp;f=false\">A Woman Pioneer on Lassen's Peak</a> <em>Overland Monthly and Out West Magazine</em> November 1924</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"http://collections.museumca.org/?q=collection-item/a65173381\">watercolors A65.173.38.1</a>, <a href=\"http://collections.museumca.org/?q=collection-item/a65173382\">pastels A65.173.38.2</a> Gift of Virginia Perry Wilson, Oakland Museum of California</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.newspapers.com/clip/81984555/helen-tanner-brodt-funeral-interment/\">Aged Artist Buried Among Many Flowers</a> <em>Oakland Tribune</em> March 12, 1908</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.newspapers.com/clip/81986844/helen-tanner-brodt/\">Not in Napa Library</a> <em>Sacramento Bee</em> January 28, 1933</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"http://www.saratogahistory.com/History/sarah_brown.htm\">Sarah Brown, Artist and Abolitionist</a> Saratoga Historical Foundation</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://napavalleyregister.com/lifestyles/real-napa/columnists/rebecca-yerger/rebecca-yerger-memory-lane-the-women-of-wilson-s-inn/article_4d568a9d-9fcf-5486-b227-73b5f2d462a9.html\">Rebecca Yerger, Memory Lane: The Women of Wilson\u2019s Inn</a> <em>Napa Valley Register</em> March 24, 2019</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.newspapers.com/clip/81989745/shirley-brodt-suicide/\">Plunged Madly To His Death</a> <em>San Francisco Chronicle</em> November 20, 1899</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.newspapers.com/clip/82056681/shirley-brodt-throws-himself-from-a/\">Broke His Neck</a> <em>Sacramento Record-Union</em> November 20, 1899</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.newspapers.com/clip/82068795/shirley-brodt-takes-his-life/\">Shirley Brodt Takes His Life</a> <em>Oakland Tribune</em> November 20, 1899</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.newspapers.com/clip/81988831/shirley-brodts-death-from-fall/\">Shirley Brodt's Death Accidental</a> <em>Oakland Tribune</em> November 21, 1899</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.newspapers.com/clip/81988993/shirley-brodt-buried-on-the-heights/\">Buried On The Heights</a> <em>San Francisco Call</em> November 24, 1899</li>\n</ol>\n", "region": "https://ja.localwiki.org/api/v4/regions/340/", "history_comment": null, "history_date": "2021-07-23T22:11:03.654", "history_type": 1, "history_user": "https://ja.localwiki.org/api/v4/users/3242/", "history_user_ip": "108.245.190.192" }, { "url": "https://ja.localwiki.org/api/v4/pages_history/1399277/", "name": "Helen Tanner Brodt", "slug": "helen tanner brodt", "content": "<p>\n\t<span class=\"image_frame image_frame_border image_right\"><img src=\"_files/NPS.jpg\" style=\"width: 300px; height: 375px;\"><span style=\"width: 300px;\" class=\"image_caption\">self portrait <sup>1</sup></span></span></p>\n<p>\n\t<strong>Helen Alice Tanner Brodt</strong> (April 21, 1838 \u2013 March 10, 1909) was an artist of some note, and the namesake of Lake Helen in Lassen Volcanic National Park. She's said to be the first white woman to climb the Mt. Lassen peak, and following the climb, expedition leader Major Pierson B. Reading named the lake for her. She also taught art in the Oakland schools; her husband was educator <a href=\"A.W.%20Brodt\">Aurelius W. (\"A.W.\") Brodt</a>. <sup>1</sup></p>\n<h3>\n\tFamily</h3>\n<p>\n\tHelen Tanner was born in Elmira, New York, in 1838 to Joshua and Sarah Tanner. After attending the National Academy of Design in New York City, she married A.W. Brodt in 1861, and they moved west to Red Bluff, California, in 1863. In August 1864, they were camping near Mt. Lassen when Major Reading's party spotted the smoke of their campfire. He invited them to join their climb, and on August 28, 1864, she became the first white woman to summit Mt. Lassen. <sup>1,2</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tHelen and A.W. had four children: daughter <strong>Ethel Brodt</strong> (1865 \u2013 1947), son <strong>Paul W. Brodt</strong> (1868 \u2013 1946), daughter <strong>Wyntie Bogardus Brodt</strong> (1875 \u2013 1963), and son <strong>Shirley M. Brodt</strong> (1876 \u2013 1899). Ethel and Paul were born in Tehama County; Wyntie and Shirley were born in Oakland.</p>\n<h3>\n\tArt career</h3>\n<p>\n\t<span class=\"image_frame image_frame_border image_right\"><img src=\"_files/Mount_Shasta_viewed_through_trees_Helen_Tanner_Brodt.jpg\" style=\"width: 239px; height: 300px;\"><span style=\"width: 239px;\" class=\"image_caption\">pastels; Mt. Shasta through the trees by Helen Tanner Brodt<br>\n\tfrom UC Berkeley Bancroft Library</span></span></p>\n<p>\n\tTanner Brodt attended the National Academy of Design in New York City. After moving to Oakland, in 1867, she became the first art instructor of noted artist <a href=\"Arthur%20F.%20Mathews\">Arthur F. Mathews</a>. <sup>1</sup> Mathews was the brother of architect <a href=\"Walter%20J.%20Mathews\">Walter J. Mathews</a>.</p>\n<p>\n\tWhile she produced some landscapes, Tanner Brodt was best known for painting portraits. Several of her paintings and drawings are owned by the UC Berkeley Bancroft Library. The <a href=\"Oakland%20Museum%20of%20California\">Oakland Museum of California</a> also has some her art supplies, a watercolor tray and a box of pastels. <sup>3</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tOne of Tanner Brodt's better-known portraits was of abolitionist <a href=\"https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Brown_(abolitionist)\">John Brown</a>, which was painted in 1864 (apparently based on a well-known daguerreotype), under the supervision of Mrs. Brown. <sup>5</sup> The painting was given to Storer College at Harper's Ferry, and may be hanging in the Harper's Ferry National Historical Park. <sup>5</sup> Another source says it's in the collection of the Smithsonian. <sup>6</sup> (See also <a href=\"https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-1-4039-7846-2_4\">John Brown, Bearded Patriarch</a> which says there was both an oil painting and a painting on a ceramic or metal plate.)</p>\n<p>\n\tKnown portraits include:</p>\n<ul>\n\t<li>\n\t\tself portrait</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\tAurelius W. Brodt</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Brown_(abolitionist)\">John Brown</a>, abolitionist</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lillie_Langtry\">Lillie Langtree</a>, actress</li>\n</ul>\n<p>\n\tHer portrait of the \"Jersey Lily\", Lillie Langtree, is said to have hung in Judge Roy Bean's courthouse saloon, The Jersey Lilly. <sup>7</sup></p>\n<h3>\n\tDeath and Burial</h3>\n<p>\n\tTanner Brodt died in Berkeley in 1909. After a funeral at the First Christian Church of Berkeley, her remains were interred at \"The Hights\". <sup>4</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tThe Brodt's son Shirley was also interred there following his death in 1898.</p>\n<h3>\n\tShirley's Death</h3>\n<p>\n\tThe Brodt's youngest son, Shirley, died in 1899 under somewhat mysterious circumstances. He was 23 years old, and working for his father at the Ralston Health Food Company.</p>\n<p>\n\tOn November 19, 1899, Shirley fell from the roof of the family house, breaking his neck or back. A neighbor, W.H. Weilbye was passing by at the time and saw Shirley's body in midair. Death was not instantaneous and a doctor was summoned, but Shirley died within an hour.</p>\n<p>\n\tThe <em>San Francisco Chronicle</em> had the headline \"Plunged Madly To His Death\" with the subhead \"Circumstances indicate that it was a deliberate suicide\", noting <em>\"Members of the family refuse to press an opinion as to whether the fall was due to accident or intent but some circumstances point strongly to suicide.\"</em> The article described Shirley as <em>\"morose and rather eccentric.\"</em> <sup>8</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tThe <em>Sacramento Record-Union</em> went with \"Broke His Neck\" and \"An Oakland Man Throws Himself From a Roof.\" The article said Shirley was <em>\"Stricken with grief over the waning of his mental faculties.\"</em> <sup>9</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tThe <em>Oakland Tribune</em> had \"Shirley Brodt Takes His Life\" and \"Dived From a Third Story Window and Broke His Neck.\" His father noted that he had been behaving strangely for a month. The article posits that \"Young Brodt was evidently out his mind,\" and said W.H. Weilbye described <em>\"the awful jump as closely resembling a high dive made by a good swimmer.\"</em> <sup>10</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tDespite these colorful descriptions and headlines suggesting it was suicide, the next day the coroner ruled the fall was accidental. <sup>11</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tA funeral was held at the family home, and Shirley's remains were interred at \"The Hights\", <a href=\"Joaquin%20Miller\">Joaquin Miller's</a> estate where <a href=\"Joaquin%20Miller%20Park\">Joaquin Miller Park</a> is now. Miller was good friends with the Brodt family, and suggested the location. <sup>12</sup></p>\n<h2>\n\tLinks and References</h2>\n<ol>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.nps.gov/people/tanner-brodt.htm\">Helen Tanner Brodt</a> nps.gov</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://books.google.com/books?id=CXjPAAAAMAAJ&amp;lpg=PA488&amp;dq=a%20woman%20pioneer%20on%20lassen%20peak%20overland%20monthly&amp;pg=PA488#v=onepage&amp;q&amp;f=false\">A Woman Pioneer on Lassen's Peak</a> <em>Overland Monthly and Out West Magazine</em> November 1924</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"http://collections.museumca.org/?q=collection-item/a65173381\">watercolors A65.173.38.1</a>, <a href=\"http://collections.museumca.org/?q=collection-item/a65173382\">pastels A65.173.38.2</a> Gift of Virginia Perry Wilson, Oakland Museum of California</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.newspapers.com/clip/81984555/helen-tanner-brodt-funeral-interment/\">Aged Artist Buried Among Many Flowers</a> <em>Oakland Tribune</em> March 12, 1908</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.newspapers.com/clip/81986844/helen-tanner-brodt/\">Not in Napa Library</a> <em>Sacramento Bee</em> January 28, 1933</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"http://www.saratogahistory.com/History/sarah_brown.htm\">Sarah Brown, Artist and Abolitionist</a> Saratoga Historical Foundation</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://napavalleyregister.com/lifestyles/real-napa/columnists/rebecca-yerger/rebecca-yerger-memory-lane-the-women-of-wilson-s-inn/article_4d568a9d-9fcf-5486-b227-73b5f2d462a9.html\">Rebecca Yerger, Memory Lane: The Women of Wilson\u2019s Inn</a> <em>Napa Valley Register</em> March 24, 2019</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.newspapers.com/clip/81989745/shirley-brodt-suicide/\">Plunged Madly To His Death</a> <em>San Francisco Chronicle</em> November 20, 1899</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.newspapers.com/clip/82056681/shirley-brodt-throws-himself-from-a/\">Broke His Neck</a> <em>Sacramento Record-Union</em> November 20, 1899</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.newspapers.com/clip/82068795/shirley-brodt-takes-his-life/\">Shirley Brodt Takes His Life</a> <em>Oakland Tribune</em> November 20, 1899</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.newspapers.com/clip/81988831/shirley-brodts-death-from-fall/\">Shirley Brodt's Death Accidental</a> <em>Oakland Tribune</em> November 21, 1899</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.newspapers.com/clip/81988993/shirley-brodt-buried-on-the-heights/\">Buried On The Heights</a> <em>San Francisco Call</em> November 24, 1899</li>\n</ol>\n", "region": "https://ja.localwiki.org/api/v4/regions/340/", "history_comment": null, "history_date": "2021-07-23T22:05:10.091", "history_type": 1, "history_user": "https://ja.localwiki.org/api/v4/users/3242/", "history_user_ip": "108.245.190.192" }, { "url": "https://ja.localwiki.org/api/v4/pages_history/1399276/", "name": "Great Western Power Station", "slug": "great western power station", "content": "<p>\n\t<span class=\"image_frame image_frame_border\"><img src=\"_files/Great%20Western%20Power%20Station.jpg\" style=\"width: 500px; height: 378px;\"><span style=\"width: 500px;\" class=\"image_caption\">Great Western Power Station, Oakland (circa 1930-1939)<sup>\u00a02,3</sup></span></span></p>\n<p>\n\tThe <strong>Great Western Power Station</strong> (aka the <strong>Park Boulevard Substation</strong>),\u00a0<span style=\"\">located at 3729 Park Boulevard, Oakland, was constructed by\u00a0</span>the <a href=\"Great%20Western%20Power%20Company\">Great Western Power Company</a>\u00a0in 1908, and expanded in 1909.<sup> 1</sup>\u00a0The building is located between what are now Grosvenor Place and Park Blvd, originally identified as Matthews Street and Fourth Avenue. <a href=\"Pacific%20Gas%20and%20Electric%20Company\">Pacific Gas and Electric Company</a>, which purchased Great Western in 1930, currently owns and operates the station.</p>\n<p>\n\tThe July 1926\u00a0<em>Journal of the American Institute of Electrical Engineers</em> lists Richard E. Ballew, systems dispatcher and Henry N. Petersen, load dispatcher. F.E. Sylvester was applying for IEEE membership. <sup>4</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tDespite being a commercial building owned by PG&amp;E, the property is within the boundaries of the <a href=\"Lakeshore%20Homes%20Association\">Lakeshore Homes Association</a>, making it the only non-residential property within the association. PG&amp;E is required to pay dues to the Association just like any other property owner. As of 2015, the dues were\u00a0$170 per property.</p>\n<h2>\n\tLinks and References</h2>\n<ol>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.newspapers.com/clip/82047517/electric-power-sub-station/\">Electric Power Sub - Station</a>\u00a0<em>Oakland Tribune</em> May 2, 1909</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\tImage(s) used by permission of the <a href=\"http://content.cdlib.org/ark:/13030/tf0x0nb2z4/?query=Great%20Western%20Power&amp;brand=calisphere\">UC Berkeley, Bancroft Library</a></li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"http://oac.cdlib.org/findaid/ark:/13030/tf1g5006hq/?&amp;brand=calisphere\">Views of Oakland, California</a>, Online Archive of California</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/document/6537284\">Membership - Applications, elections, transfers, etc.</a>\u00a0<em>Journal of the American Institute of Electrical Engineers</em> July 1926</li>\n</ol>\n", "region": "https://ja.localwiki.org/api/v4/regions/340/", "history_comment": null, "history_date": "2021-07-23T19:26:41.818", "history_type": 1, "history_user": "https://ja.localwiki.org/api/v4/users/3242/", "history_user_ip": "108.245.190.192" }, { "url": "https://ja.localwiki.org/api/v4/pages_history/1399275/", "name": "Great Western Power Station", "slug": "great western power station", "content": "<p>\n\t<span class=\"image_frame image_frame_border\"><img src=\"_files/Great%20Western%20Power%20Station.jpg\" style=\"width: 500px; height: 378px;\"><span style=\"width: 500px;\" class=\"image_caption\">Great Western Power Station, Oakland (circa 1930-1939)<sup>\u00a02,3</sup></span></span></p>\n<p>\n\tThe <strong>Great Western Power Station</strong> (aka the <strong>Park Boulevard Substation</strong>),\u00a0<span style=\"\">located at 3729 Park Boulevard, Oakland, was constructed by\u00a0</span>the <a href=\"Great%20Western%20Power%20Company\">Great Western Power Company</a>\u00a0in 1908, and expanded in 1909.<sup> 1</sup>\u00a0The building is located between what are now Grosvenor Place and Park Blvd, originally identified as Matthews Street and Fourth Avenue. <a href=\"Pacific%20Gas%20and%20Electric%20Company\">Pacific Gas and Electric Company</a>, which purchased Great Western in 1930, currently owns and operates the station.</p>\n<p>\n\tThe July 1926\u00a0Journal of the American Institute of Electrical Engineers lists Richard E. Ballew, systems dispatcher and Henry N. Petersen, load dispatcher. F.E. Sylvester was applying for IEEE membership. <sup>4</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tDespite being a commercial building owned by PG&amp;E, the property is within the boundaries of the <a href=\"Lakeshore%20Homes%20Association\">Lakeshore Homes Association</a>, making it the only non-residential property within the association. PG&amp;E is required to pay dues to the Association just like any other property owner. As of 2015, the dues were\u00a0$170 per property.</p>\n<h2>\n\tLinks and References</h2>\n<ol>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.newspapers.com/clip/82047517/electric-power-sub-station/\">Electric Power Sub - Station</a>\u00a0<em>Oakland Tribune</em> May 2, 1909</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\tImage(s) used by permission of the <a href=\"http://content.cdlib.org/ark:/13030/tf0x0nb2z4/?query=Great%20Western%20Power&amp;brand=calisphere\">UC Berkeley, Bancroft Library</a></li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"http://oac.cdlib.org/findaid/ark:/13030/tf1g5006hq/?&amp;brand=calisphere\">Views of Oakland, California</a>, Online Archive of California</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/document/6537284\">Membership - Applications, elections, transfers, etc.</a>\u00a0<em>Journal of the American Institute of Electrical Engineers</em> July 1926</li>\n</ol>\n", "region": "https://ja.localwiki.org/api/v4/regions/340/", "history_comment": null, "history_date": "2021-07-23T19:21:13.936", "history_type": 1, "history_user": "https://ja.localwiki.org/api/v4/users/3242/", "history_user_ip": "108.245.190.192" }, { "url": "https://ja.localwiki.org/api/v4/pages_history/1399274/", "name": "Helen Tanner Brodt", "slug": "helen tanner brodt", "content": "<p>\n\t<span class=\"image_frame image_frame_border image_right\"><img src=\"_files/NPS.jpg\" style=\"width: 300px; height: 375px;\"><span style=\"width: 300px;\" class=\"image_caption\">self portrait <sup>1</sup></span></span></p>\n<p>\n\t<strong>Helen Alice Tanner Brodt</strong> (April 21, 1838 \u2013 March 10, 1909) was an artist of some note, and the namesake of Lake Helen in Lassen Volcanic National Park. She's said to be the first white woman to climb the Mt. Lassen peak, and following the climb, expedition leader\u00a0Major Pierson B. Reading named the lake for her. She also taught art in the Oakland schools; her husband was educator <a href=\"A.W.%20Brodt\">Aurelius W. (\"A.W.\") Brodt</a>. <sup>1</sup></p>\n<h3>\n\tFamily</h3>\n<p>\n\tHelen Tanner was born in Elmira, New York, in 1838 to Joshua and Sarah Tanner. After attending the\u00a0National Academy of Design in New York City, she married A.W. Brodt in 1861, and they moved west to Red Bluff, California, in 1863. In August 1864, they were camping near Mt. Lassen when Major Reading's party spotted the smoke of their campfire. He invited them to join their climb, and on August 28, 1864, she became the first white woman to summit Mt. Lassen. <sup>1,2</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tHelen and A.W. had four children: daughter <strong>Ethel Brodt</strong> (1865 \u2013 1947), son <strong>Paul W. Brodt</strong> (1868 \u2013 1946), daughter <strong>Wyntie Bogardus Brodt</strong> (1875 \u2013 1963), and son <strong>Shirley M. Brodt</strong> (1876 \u2013 1899). Ethel and Paul were born in Tehama County; Wyntie and Shirley were born in Oakland.</p>\n<h3>\n\tArt career</h3>\n<p>\n\t<span class=\"image_frame image_frame_border image_right\"><img src=\"_files/Mount_Shasta_viewed_through_trees_Helen_Tanner_Brodt.jpg\" style=\"width: 239px; height: 300px;\"><span style=\"width: 239px;\" class=\"image_caption\">pastels; Mt. Shasta through the trees by Helen Tanner Brodt<br>\n\tfrom UC Berkeley Bancroft Library</span></span></p>\n<p>\n\tTanner Brodt attended the National Academy of Design in New York City. After moving to Oakland, in 1867, she became the first art instructor of noted artist <a href=\"Arthur%20F.%20Mathews\">Arthur F. Mathews</a>. <sup>1</sup> Mathews was the brother of architect <a href=\"Walter%20J.%20Mathews\">Walter J. Mathews</a>.</p>\n<p>\n\tWhile she produced some landscapes, Tanner Brodt was best known for painting portraits. Several of her paintings and drawings are owned by the UC Berkeley Bancroft Library. The <a href=\"Oakland%20Museum%20of%20California\">Oakland Museum of California</a> also has some her art supplies, a watercolor tray and a box of pastels. <sup>3</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tOne of Tanner Brodt's better-known portraits was of abolitionist <a href=\"https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Brown_(abolitionist)\">John Brown</a>, which was painted in 1864 (apparently based on a well-known\u00a0daguerreotype), under the supervision of Mrs. Brown. <sup>5</sup> The painting was given to Storer College at Harper's Ferry, and may be hanging in the Harper's Ferry National Historical Park. <sup>5</sup> Another source says it's in the collection of the Smithsonian. <sup>6</sup> (See also <a href=\"https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-1-4039-7846-2_4\">John Brown, Bearded Patriarch</a>\u00a0which says there was both an oil painting and a painting on a ceramic or metal plate.)</p>\n<p>\n\tKnown portraits include:</p>\n<ul>\n\t<li>\n\t\tself portrait</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\tAurelius W. Brodt</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Brown_(abolitionist)\">John Brown</a>, abolitionist</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lillie_Langtry\">Lillie Langtree</a>, actress</li>\n</ul>\n<p>\n\tHer portrait of the \"Jersey Lily\", Lillie Langtree, is said to have hung in Judge Roy Bean's courthouse saloon, The Jersey Lilly. <sup>7</sup></p>\n<h3>\n\tDeath and Burial</h3>\n<p>\n\tTanner Brodt died in Berkeley in 1909. After a funeral at the First Christian Church of Berkeley, her remains were interred at \"The Hights\", <a href=\"Joaquin%20Miller\">Joaquin Miller's</a> estate where <a href=\"Joaquin%20Miller%20Park\">Joaquin Miller Park</a> is now. <sup>4</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tThe Brodt's son Shirley was also interred there following his death in 1898.</p>\n<h2>\n\tLinks and References</h2>\n<ol>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.nps.gov/people/tanner-brodt.htm\">Helen Tanner Brodt</a> nps.gov</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://books.google.com/books?id=CXjPAAAAMAAJ&amp;lpg=PA488&amp;dq=a%20woman%20pioneer%20on%20lassen%20peak%20overland%20monthly&amp;pg=PA488#v=onepage&amp;q&amp;f=false\">A Woman Pioneer on Lassen's Peak</a> <em>Overland Monthly and Out West Magazine</em> November 1924</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"http://collections.museumca.org/?q=collection-item/a65173381\">watercolors A65.173.38.1</a>, <a href=\"http://collections.museumca.org/?q=collection-item/a65173382\">pastels A65.173.38.2</a> Gift of Virginia Perry Wilson, Oakland Museum of California</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.newspapers.com/clip/81984555/helen-tanner-brodt-funeral-interment/\">Aged Artist Buried Among Many Flowers</a> <em>Oakland Tribune</em> March 12, 1908</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.newspapers.com/clip/81986844/helen-tanner-brodt/\">Not in Napa Library</a> <em>Sacramento Bee</em> January 28, 1933</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"http://www.saratogahistory.com/History/sarah_brown.htm\">Sarah Brown, Artist and Abolitionist</a> Saratoga Historical Foundation</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://napavalleyregister.com/lifestyles/real-napa/columnists/rebecca-yerger/rebecca-yerger-memory-lane-the-women-of-wilson-s-inn/article_4d568a9d-9fcf-5486-b227-73b5f2d462a9.html\">Rebecca Yerger, Memory Lane: The Women of Wilson\u2019s Inn</a> <em>Napa Valley Register</em> March 24, 2019</li>\n</ol>\n", "region": "https://ja.localwiki.org/api/v4/regions/340/", "history_comment": null, "history_date": "2021-07-23T18:00:44.498", "history_type": 1, "history_user": "https://ja.localwiki.org/api/v4/users/3242/", "history_user_ip": "108.245.190.192" }, { "url": "https://ja.localwiki.org/api/v4/pages_history/1399273/", "name": "Helen Tanner Brodt", "slug": "helen tanner brodt", "content": "<p>\n\t<span class=\"image_frame image_frame_border image_right\"><img src=\"_files/NPS.jpg\" style=\"width: 300px; height: 375px;\"><span style=\"width: 300px;\" class=\"image_caption\">self portrait <sup>1</sup></span></span></p>\n<p>\n\t<strong>Helen Alice Tanner Brodt</strong> (April 21, 1838 \u2013 March 10, 1909) was an artist of some note, and the namesake of Lake Helen in Lassen Volcanic National Park. She's said to be the first white woman to climb the Mt. Lassen peak, and following the climb, expedition leader\u00a0Major Pierson B. Reading named the lake for her. She also taught art in the Oakland schools; her husband was educator <a href=\"A.W.%20Brodt\">Aurelius W. (\"A.W.\") Brodt</a>. <sup>1</sup></p>\n<h3>\n\tFamily</h3>\n<p>\n\tHelen Tanner was born in Elmira, New York, in 1838 to Joshua and Sarah Tanner. After attending the\u00a0National Academy of Design in New York City, she married A.W. Brodt in 1861, and they moved west to Red Bluff, California, in 1863. In August 1864, they were camping near Mt. Lassen when Major Reading's party spotted the smoke of their campfire. He invited them to join their climb, and on August 28, 1864, she became the first white woman to summit Mt. Lassen. <sup>1,2</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tHelen and A.W. had four children: daughter <strong>Ethel Brodt</strong> (1865 \u2013 1947), son <strong>Paul W. Brodt</strong> (1868 \u2013 1946), daughter <strong>Wyntie Bogardus Brodt</strong> (1875 \u2013 1963), and son <strong>Shirley M. Brodt</strong> (1876 \u2013 1899). Ethel and Paul were born in Tehama County; Wyntie and Shirley were born in Oakland.</p>\n<h3>\n\tArt career</h3>\n<p>\n\t<span class=\"image_frame image_frame_border image_right\"><img src=\"_files/Mount_Shasta_viewed_through_trees_Helen_Tanner_Brodt.jpg\" style=\"width: 239px; height: 300px;\"><span style=\"width: 239px;\" class=\"image_caption\">pastels; Mt. Shasta through the trees by Helen Tanner Brodt<br>\n\tfrom UC Berkeley Bancroft Library</span></span></p>\n<p>\n\tTanner Brodt attended the National Academy of Design in New York City. After moving to Oakland, in 1867, she became the first art instructor of noted artist <a href=\"Arthur%20F.%20Mathews\">Arthur F. Mathews</a>. <sup>1</sup> Mathews was the brother of architect <a href=\"Walter%20J.%20Mathews\">Walter J. Mathews</a>.</p>\n<p>\n\tWhile she produced some landscapes, Tanner Brodt was best known for painting portraits. Several of her paintings and drawings are owned by the UC Berkeley Bancroft Library. The <a href=\"Oakland%20Museum%20of%20California\">Oakland Museum of California</a> also has some her art supplies, a watercolor tray and a box of pastels. <sup>3</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tOne of Tanner Brodt's better-known portraits was of abolitionist <a href=\"https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Brown_(abolitionist)\">John Brown</a>, which was painted in 1864 (apparently based on a well-known\u00a0daguerreotype), under the supervision of Mrs. Brown. <sup>5</sup> The painting was given to Storer College at Harper's Ferry, and may be hanging in the Harper's Ferry National Historical Park. <sup>5</sup> Another source says it's in the collection of the Smithsonian. <sup>6</sup> (See also <a href=\"https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-1-4039-7846-2_4\">John Brown, Bearded Patriarch</a>\u00a0which says there was both an oil painting and a painting on a ceramic or metal plate.)</p>\n<p>\n\tKnown portraits include:</p>\n<ul>\n\t<li>\n\t\tself portrait</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\tAurelius W. Brodt</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Brown_(abolitionist)\">John Brown</a>, abolitionist</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lillie_Langtry\">Lillie Langtree</a>, actress</li>\n</ul>\n<p>\n\tHer portrait of the \"Jersey Lily\", Lillie Langtree, is said to have hung in Judge Roy Bean's courthouse saloon, The Jersey Lilly. <sup>7</sup></p>\n<h3>\n\tDeath and Burial</h3>\n<p>\n\tTanner Brodt died in Berkeley in 1909. After a funeral at the First Christian Church of Berkeley, her remains were interred at \"The Hights\", <a href=\"Joaquin%20Miller\">Joaquin Miller's</a> estate where <a href=\"Joaquin%20Miller%20Park\">Joaquin Miller Park</a> is now. <sup>4</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tThe Brodt's son Shirley was also interred there following his death in 1898.</p>\n<h2>\n\tLinks and References</h2>\n<ol>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.nps.gov/people/tanner-brodt.htm\">Helen Tanner Brodt</a> nps.gov</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://books.google.com/books?id=CXjPAAAAMAAJ&amp;lpg=PA488&amp;dq=a%20woman%20pioneer%20on%20lassen%20peak%20overland%20monthly&amp;pg=PA488#v=onepage&amp;q&amp;f=false\">A Woman Pioneer on Lassen's Peak</a> <em>Overland Monthly and Out West Magazine</em> November 1924</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"http://collections.museumca.org/?q=collection-item/a65173381\">watercolors A65.173.38.1</a>, <a href=\"http://collections.museumca.org/?q=collection-item/a65173382\">pastels A65.173.38.2</a> Gift of Virginia Perry Wilson, Oakland Museum of California</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.newspapers.com/clip/81984555/helen-tanner-brodt-funeral-interment/\">Aged Artist Buried Among Many Flowers</a> <em>Oakland Tribune</em> March 12, 1908</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.newspapers.com/clip/81986844/helen-tanner-brodt/\">Not in Napa Library</a> <em>Sacramento Bee</em> January 28, 1933</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"http://www.saratogahistory.com/History/sarah_brown.htm\">Sarah Brown, Artist and Abolitionist</a> Saratoga Historical Foundation</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://napavalleyregister.com/lifestyles/real-napa/columnists/rebecca-yerger/rebecca-yerger-memory-lane-the-women-of-wilson-s-inn/article_4d568a9d-9fcf-5486-b227-73b5f2d462a9.html\">Rebecca Yerger, Memory Lane: The Women of Wilson\u2019s Inn</a> <em>Napa Valley Register</em> March 24, 2019</li>\n</ol>\n", "region": "https://ja.localwiki.org/api/v4/regions/340/", "history_comment": null, "history_date": "2021-07-23T17:09:16.200", "history_type": 1, "history_user": "https://ja.localwiki.org/api/v4/users/3242/", "history_user_ip": "108.245.190.192" }, { "url": "https://ja.localwiki.org/api/v4/pages_history/1399272/", "name": "Helen Tanner Brodt", "slug": "helen tanner brodt", "content": "<p>\n\t<span class=\"image_frame image_frame_border image_right\"><img src=\"_files/NPS.jpg\" style=\"width: 300px; height: 375px;\"><span style=\"width: 300px;\" class=\"image_caption\">self portrait <sup>1</sup></span></span></p>\n<p>\n\t<strong>Helen Alice Tanner Brodt</strong> (April 21, 1838 \u2013 March 10, 1909) was an artist of some note, and the namesake of Lake Helen in Lassen Volcanic National Park. She's said to be the first white woman to climb the Mt. Lassen peak, and following the climb, expedition leader\u00a0Major Pierson B. Reading named the lake for her. She also taught art in the Oakland schools; her husband was educator <a href=\"A.W.%20Brodt\">Aurelius W. (\"A.W.\") Brodt</a>. <sup>1</sup></p>\n<h3>\n\tFamily</h3>\n<p>\n\tHelen Tanner was born in Elmira, New York, in 1838 to Joshua and Sarah Tanner. After attending the\u00a0National Academy of Design in New York City, she married A.W. Brodt in 1861, and they moved west to Red Bluff, California, in 1863. In August 1864, they were camping near Mt. Lassen when Major Reading's party spotted the smoke of their campfire. He invited them to join their climb, and on August 28, 1864, she became the first white woman to summit Mt. Lassen. <sup>1,2</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tHelen and A.W. had four children: daughter <strong>Ethel Brodt</strong> (1865 \u2013 1947), son <strong>Paul W. Brodt</strong> (1868 \u2013 1946), daughter <strong>Wyntie Bogardus Brodt</strong> (1875 \u2013 1963), and son <strong>Shirley M. Brodt</strong> (1876 \u2013 1899). Ethel and Paul were born in Tehama County; Wyntie and Shirley were born in Oakland.</p>\n<h3>\n\tArt career</h3>\n<p>\n\t<span class=\"image_frame image_frame_border image_right\"><img src=\"_files/Mount_Shasta_viewed_through_trees_Helen_Tanner_Brodt.jpg\" style=\"width: 239px; height: 300px;\"><span style=\"width: 239px;\" class=\"image_caption\">pastels; Mt. Shasta through the trees by Helen Tanner Brodt<br>\n\tfrom UC Berkeley Bancroft Library</span></span></p>\n<p>\n\tTanner Brodt attended the National Academy of Design in New York City. After moving to Oakland, in 1867, she became the first art instructor of noted artist <a href=\"Arthur%20F.%20Mathews\">Arthur F. Mathews</a>. <sup>1</sup> Mathews was the brother of architect <a href=\"Walter%20J.%20Mathews\">Walter J. Mathews</a>.</p>\n<p>\n\tWhile she produced some landscapes, Tanner Brodt was best known for painting portraits. Several of her paintings and drawings are owned by the UC Berkeley Bancroft Library. The <a href=\"Oakland%20Museum%20of%20California\">Oakland Museum of California</a> also has some her art supplies, a watercolor tray and a box of pastels. <sup>3</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tOne of Tanner Brodt's better-known portraits was of abolitionist <a href=\"https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Brown_(abolitionist)\">John Brown</a>, which was painted in 1864 (apparently based on a well-known\u00a0daguerreotype), under the supervision of Mrs. Brown. <sup>5</sup> The painting was given to Storer College at Harper's Ferry, and may be hanging in the Harper's Ferry National Historical Park. <sup>5</sup> Another source says it's in the collection of the Smithsonian. <sup>6</sup> (See also <a href=\"https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-1-4039-7846-2_4\">John Brown, Bearded Patriarch</a>\u00a0which says there was both an oil painting and a painting on a ceramic or metal plate.)</p>\n<p>\n\tKnown portraits include:</p>\n<ul>\n\t<li>\n\t\tself portrait</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\tAurelius W. Brodt</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\tJohn Brown</li>\n</ul>\n<h3>\n\tDeath and Burial</h3>\n<p>\n\tTanner Brodt died in Berkeley in 1909. After a funeral at the First Christian Church of Berkeley, her remains were interred at \"The Hights\", <a href=\"Joaquin%20Miller\">Joaquin Miller's</a> estate where <a href=\"Joaquin%20Miller%20Park\">Joaquin Miller Park</a> is now. <sup>4</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tThe Brodt's son Shirley was also interred there following his death in 1898.</p>\n<h2>\n\tLinks and References</h2>\n<ol>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.nps.gov/people/tanner-brodt.htm\">Helen Tanner Brodt</a> nps.gov</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://books.google.com/books?id=CXjPAAAAMAAJ&amp;lpg=PA488&amp;dq=a%20woman%20pioneer%20on%20lassen%20peak%20overland%20monthly&amp;pg=PA488#v=onepage&amp;q&amp;f=false\">A Woman Pioneer on Lassen's Peak</a> <em>Overland Monthly and Out West Magazine</em> November 1924</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"http://collections.museumca.org/?q=collection-item/a65173381\">watercolors A65.173.38.1</a>, <a href=\"http://collections.museumca.org/?q=collection-item/a65173382\">pastels A65.173.38.2</a> Gift of Virginia Perry Wilson, Oakland Museum of California</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.newspapers.com/clip/81984555/helen-tanner-brodt-funeral-interment/\">Aged Artist Buried Among Many Flowers</a> <em>Oakland Tribune</em> March 12, 1908</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.newspapers.com/clip/81986844/helen-tanner-brodt/\">Not in Napa Library</a> <em>Sacramento Bee</em> January 28, 1933</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"http://www.saratogahistory.com/History/sarah_brown.htm\">Sarah Brown, Artist and Abolitionist</a> Saratoga Historical Foundation</li>\n</ol>\n", "region": "https://ja.localwiki.org/api/v4/regions/340/", "history_comment": null, "history_date": "2021-07-23T16:35:12.381", "history_type": 1, "history_user": "https://ja.localwiki.org/api/v4/users/3242/", "history_user_ip": "108.245.190.192" }, { "url": "https://ja.localwiki.org/api/v4/pages_history/1399271/", "name": "Helen Tanner Brodt", "slug": "helen tanner brodt", "content": "<p>\n\t<span class=\"image_frame image_frame_border image_right\"><img src=\"_files/NPS.jpg\" style=\"width: 300px; height: 375px;\"><span style=\"width: 300px;\" class=\"image_caption\">self portrait <sup>1</sup></span></span></p>\n<p>\n\t<strong>Helen Alice Tanner Brodt</strong> (April 21, 1838 \u2013 March 10, 1909) was an artist of some note, and the namesake of Lake Helen in Lassen Volcanic National Park. She's said to be the first white woman to climb the Mt. Lassen peak, and following the climb, expedition leader\u00a0Major Pierson B. Reading named the lake for her. She also taught art in the Oakland schools; her husband was educator <a href=\"A.W.%20Brodt\">Aurelius W. (\"A.W.\") Brodt</a>. <sup>1</sup></p>\n<h3>\n\tFamily</h3>\n<p>\n\tHelen Tanner was born in Elmira, New York, in 1838 to Joshua and Sarah Tanner. After attending the\u00a0National Academy of Design in New York City, she married A.W. Brodt in 1861, and they moved west to Red Bluff, California, in 1863. In August 1864, they were camping near Mt. Lassen when Major Reading's party spotted the smoke of their campfire. He invited them to join their climb, and on August 28, 1864, she became the first white woman to summit Mt. Lassen. <sup>1,2</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tHelen and A.W. had four children daughter <strong>Ethel Brodt</strong> (1865 \u2013 1947), son <strong>Paul W. Brodt</strong> (1868 \u2013 1946), daughter <strong>Wyntie Bogardus Brodt</strong> (1875 \u2013 1963), and son <strong>Shirley M. Brodt</strong> (1876 \u2013 1899). Ethel and Paul were born in Tehama County; Wyntie and Shirley were born in Oakland.</p>\n<h3>\n\tArt career</h3>\n<p>\n\t<span class=\"image_frame image_frame_border image_right\"><img src=\"_files/Mount_Shasta_viewed_through_trees_Helen_Tanner_Brodt.jpg\" style=\"width: 239px; height: 300px;\"><span style=\"width: 239px;\" class=\"image_caption\">pastels; Mt. Shasta through the trees by Helen Tanner Brodt<br>\n\tfrom UC Berkeley Bancroft Library</span></span></p>\n<p>\n\tTanner Brodt attended the National Academy of Design in New York City. After moving to Oakland, in 1867, she became the first art instructor of noted artist <a href=\"Arthur%20F.%20Mathews\">Arthur F. Mathews</a>. <sup>1</sup> Mathews was the brother of architect <a href=\"Walter%20J.%20Mathews\">Walter J. Mathews</a>.</p>\n<p>\n\tWhile she produced some landscapes, Tanner Brodt was best known for painting portraits. Several of her paintings and drawings are owned by the UC Berkeley Bancroft Library. The <a href=\"Oakland%20Museum%20of%20California\">Oakland Museum of California</a> also has some her art supplies, a watercolor tray and a box of pastels. <sup>3</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tOne of Tanner Brodt's better-known portraits was of abolitionist <a href=\"https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Brown_(abolitionist)\">John Brown</a>, which was painted in 1864 (apparently based on a well-known\u00a0daguerreotype), under the supervision of Mrs. Brown. <sup>5</sup> The painting was given to Storer College at Harper's Ferry, and may be hanging in the Harper's Ferry National Historical Park. <sup>5</sup> Another source says it's in the collection of the Smithsonian. <sup>6</sup> (See also <a href=\"https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-1-4039-7846-2_4\">John Brown, Bearded Patriarch</a>\u00a0which says there was both an oil painting and a painting on a ceramic or metal plate.)</p>\n<p>\n\tKnown portraits include:</p>\n<ul>\n\t<li>\n\t\tself portrait</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\tAurelius W. Brodt</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\tJohn Brown</li>\n</ul>\n<h3>\n\tDeath and Burial</h3>\n<p>\n\tTanner Brodt died in Berkeley in 1909. After a funeral at the First Christian Church of Berkeley, her remains were interred at \"The Hights\", <a href=\"Joaquin%20Miller\">Joaquin Miller's</a> estate where <a href=\"Joaquin%20Miller%20Park\">Joaquin Miller Park</a> is now. <sup>4</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tThe Brodt's son Shirley was also interred there following his death in 1898.</p>\n<h2>\n\tLinks and References</h2>\n<ol>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.nps.gov/people/tanner-brodt.htm\">Helen Tanner Brodt</a> nps.gov</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://books.google.com/books?id=CXjPAAAAMAAJ&amp;lpg=PA488&amp;dq=a%20woman%20pioneer%20on%20lassen%20peak%20overland%20monthly&amp;pg=PA488#v=onepage&amp;q&amp;f=false\">A Woman Pioneer on Lassen's Peak</a> <em>Overland Monthly and Out West Magazine</em> November 1924</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"http://collections.museumca.org/?q=collection-item/a65173381\">watercolors A65.173.38.1</a>, <a href=\"http://collections.museumca.org/?q=collection-item/a65173382\">pastels A65.173.38.2</a> Gift of Virginia Perry Wilson, Oakland Museum of California</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.newspapers.com/clip/81984555/helen-tanner-brodt-funeral-interment/\">Aged Artist Buried Among Many Flowers</a> <em>Oakland Tribune</em> March 12, 1908</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.newspapers.com/clip/81986844/helen-tanner-brodt/\">Not in Napa Library</a> <em>Sacramento Bee</em> January 28, 1933</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"http://www.saratogahistory.com/History/sarah_brown.htm\">Sarah Brown, Artist and Abolitionist</a> Saratoga Historical Foundation</li>\n</ol>\n", "region": "https://ja.localwiki.org/api/v4/regions/340/", "history_comment": null, "history_date": "2021-07-23T16:22:59.386", "history_type": 1, "history_user": "https://ja.localwiki.org/api/v4/users/3242/", "history_user_ip": "108.245.190.192" }, { "url": "https://ja.localwiki.org/api/v4/pages_history/1399270/", "name": "Sharing SLO", "slug": "sharing slo", "content": "<p>\n\tThis <strong>Sharing SLO</strong> page gives an overview of some of San Luis Obispo\u2019s sharing economy.</p>\n<p>\n\t<span class=\"follow_item image_frame image_frame_border\"><img src=\"_files/4464982807_6964a9448f_o.jpg\" style=\"width: 285px; height: 300px;\"><span style=\"width: 285px;\" class=\"image_caption\"><a href=\"https://www.flickr.com/photos/denisecarbonell/4464982807/\">Photo by Denise Carbonell</a> <sup>(<a href=\"https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/\">CC BY 2.0</a>)</sup></span></span></p>\n<p>\n\tEvery town has a \u201cSharing Economy,\u201d which sometimes goes by names like \u201ccaring economy,\u201d \u201csolidarity economy,\u201d \u201ctransition,\u201d and \u201ccommunity resilience.\u201d There are currently movements afoot around the world to try to organize local sharing economies and help them to grow and thrive. Elements of the sharing economy include:</p>\n<ol>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<strong><a href=\"#making\">Making / Repurposing / Repairing / Recycling Things</a></strong></li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<strong><a href=\"#food\">Food &amp; Garden</a></strong></li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<strong><a href=\"#helping\">People Helping People</a></strong></li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<strong><a href=\"#experiments\">Sharing Economy Entrepreneurs &amp; Experiments</a></strong></li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<strong><a href=\"#environment\">Environmental Protection</a></strong></li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<strong><a href=\"#commons\">Commons and Public Spaces</a></strong></li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<strong><a href=\"#education\">Skills-Sharing &amp; Education</a></strong></li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<strong><a href=\"#groups\">Neighborhood and Common Interest Groups</a></strong></li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<strong><a href=\"#health\">Health &amp; Fitness</a></strong></li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<strong><a href=\"#transit\">Transportation</a></strong></li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<strong><a href=\"#media\">Public &amp; Local Media</a></strong></li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<strong><a href=\"#legal\">Legal Assistance &amp; Mediation</a></strong></li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<strong><a href=\"#events\">Free Public Events and Activities</a></strong></li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<strong><a href=\"#housing\">Housing</a></strong></li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<strong><a href=\"#misc\">\u2026and more!</a></strong></li>\n</ol>\n<table>\n\t<tbody>\n\t\t<tr>\n\t\t\t<td>\n\t\t\t\t<p>\n\t\t\t\t\t<u>Note:</u> the site\u00a0<a href=\"https://helpslo.com/\">https://helpslo.com/</a> began coordinating a lot of local, grassroots mutual aid efforts during the Covid-19 pandemic.</p>\n\t\t\t\t<p>\n\t\t\t\t\tAssistance to undocumented immigrants is being coordinated by\u00a0<a href=\"https://sloundocusupport.org/\">https://sloundocusupport.org/</a>.<tt> #SLOfightingCOVID</tt></p>\n\t\t\t</td>\n\t\t</tr>\n\t</tbody>\n</table>\n<h1>\n\t<a name=\"making\"></a>Making / Repurposing / Repairing / Recycling Things</h1>\n<ul>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"The%20Bike%20Kitchen\">Bike Kitchen</a> \u2014 bicycle maintenance education, parts recycling and do-it-yourself work</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t(defunct) <a href=\"Central%20Coast%20SLO-Recycle\">Central Coast SLO-Recycle</a>\u00a0\u2014 an email list for people who want to give away things they no longer have use for</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t(defunct) <a href=\"The%20Community%20Cabinet\">The Community Cabinet</a> \u2014 have something you don't want anymore? Put it in! See something you like? Take it!</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"E-Waste%20Fundraiser\">E-Waste Fundraiser</a>\u00a0\u2014 let young techies repurpose your obsolete electronics</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"iFixit\">iFixit</a>\u00a0\u2014\u00a0creates and hosts open-source repair documentation and produces how-to repair videos</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Recycled%20Building%20Materials\">Recycled Building Materials</a> \u2014 Habitat for Humanity ReStore, Box Kite Barnyard, SLO Green Build, Pacific Coast Lumber</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"SLO%20Freecycle\">SLO Freecycle</a> \u2014 keeping stuff out of landfills while building a sense of community</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"SLO%20MakerSpace\">SLO MakerSpace</a> \u2014 an open, collaborative shop and idea laboratory where people can make their projects</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t(defunct) <a href=\"Sm(ART)%20Studio\">Sm(ART) Studio</a> \u2014 make art with sustainable arts, crafts, household goods, and materials</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Studio%20Stitch\">Studio Stitch</a> \u2014 learn fabric arts skills (e.g. sewing) in workshops and classes</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Thrift%20Stores\">Thrift Stores</a> \u2014 giving used but usable clothes and goods a second chance</li>\n</ul>\n<h1>\n\t<a name=\"food\"></a>Food &amp; Garden</h1>\n<h2>\n\tMostly Food &amp; Beverage</h2>\n<ul class=\"indent1\">\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"ASN%20Food%20Pantry\">ASN Food Pantry</a>\u00a0\u2014 supplies clients with canned goods, dry goods, and toiletries</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Atascadero%20Loaves%20%26%20Fishes%20Food%20Pantry\">Atascadero Loaves &amp; Fishes Food Pantry</a>\u00a0\u2014 groceries and other household items for those in need</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Avila%20Valley%20Barn\">Avila Valley Farm</a> \u2014 teaches home canning/preserving</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Backyard%20Produce%20Exchange\">Backyard Produce Exchange</a>\u00a0\u2014 SLO gardeners swapping their harvests</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Center%20For%20Sustainability\">Cal Poly Center for Sustainability</a> \u2014 cutting edge topics in sustainable food systems</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Central%20Coast%20Home%20Vintners'%20Association\">Central Coast Home Vintners\u2019 Association</a> \u2014 cooperative purchases of grapes, mentoring of new vintners</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"City%20Farm%E2%80%93San%20Luis%20Obispo\">City Farm</a> \u2014 organic agriculture, youth empowerment, community education and a CSA</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"City%20Farm%20SLO\">City Farm SLO</a> \u2014 nonprofit that champions a sustainable local and regional food system</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Community%20Caf%C3%A9%20Days\">Community Caf\u00e9 Days</a>\u00a0\u2014 healthy food on a pay-what-you-can plan</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"CSA\">Community Supported Agriculture</a> \u2014 several CSA local food delivery programs exist</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Doc's%20Cellar\">Doc\u2019s Cellar</a> \u2014 supports DIY homebrewers</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Dumpster%20Diving\">Dumpster Diving</a>\u00a0\u2014 last chance to save food before it goes to the landfill</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Farmers%20Markets\">Farmers Markets</a> \u2014 we have several in town</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Five%20Cities%20Christian%20Women%20Food%20Pantry\">Five Cities Christian Women Food Pantry</a>\u00a0\u2014 providing food to hundreds of needy families</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Food%20Bank\">Food Bank</a>\u00a0\u2014 a source of food for people in need</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Food%20Not%20Bombs\">Food Not Bombs</a>\u00a0\u2014 giving away meals to anyone who'd like one, without asking permission</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"GleanSLO\">Glean SLO</a>\u00a0\u2014 harvests and donates excess produce</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"God's%20Storehouse\">God\u2019s Storehouse</a>\u00a0\u2014 share the Gospel by helping meet the nutritional and spiritual needs of others</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Little%20Free%20Pantries\">Little Free Pantries</a> \u2014 sidewalk boxes of food and other essentials, free for those in need</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Master%20Food%20Preserver%20Program\">Master Food Preserver Program</a> \u2014 learn and teach food preserving techniques</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Meals%20on%20Wheels\">Meals on Wheels</a>\u00a0\u2014 delivers nutritious meals to the homebound of all ages</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Meals%20that%20Connect\">Meals that Connect</a>\u00a0\u2014 free, nutritious meals for seniors</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Paso%20Food%20Co-Op\">Paso Food Co-Op</a> \u2014\u00a0maximizing abundance, access, and affordability of fresh, healthy, and local food</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"People's%20Kitchen\">People\u2019s Kitchen</a>\u00a0\u2014 for more than 20 years has provided a noon meal to the hungry</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"People%E2%80%99s%20Revolutionary%20Garden%20Network\">People\u2019s Revolutionary Garden Network</a> \u2014 gardening as a tool to fight oppressive systems</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Public%20Fruit%20Trees\">Public Fruit Trees</a>\u00a0and <a href=\"Public%20Berry%20Bushes\">Public Berry Bushes</a> \u2014 glean a snack</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Real%20Food%20Collaborative\">Real Food Collaborative</a>\u00a0\u2014\u00a0working with, learning about, and improving our food system</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t(defunct) <a href=\"Senior%20Nutrition%20Program\">Senior Nutrition Program</a>\u00a0\u2014\u00a0provided free, hot noon-time meals to seniors 60 years of age and over throughout SLO County (now <a href=\"Meals%20that%20Connect\">Meals That Connect</a>)</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t(defunct) <a href=\"SLOcavore\">SLOcavore</a> \u2014 experiential education that will deepen your understanding of local agriculture</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"SLO%20County%20Food%20System%20Coalition\">SLO County Food System Coalition</a>\u00a0\u2014\u00a0promotes a sustainable food system that is equitable, profitable, resilient, and health promoting</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Natural%20Foods%20Co-Op%20of%20SLO\">SLO Food Co-Op</a> \u2014 provides members with products and information that empower health and wellbeing</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"SLO%20Grown%20Kids\">SLO Grown Kids</a>\u00a0\u2014\u00a0integrates gardens, farm experiences, locally grown produce, and nutrition into core academic curricula</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"SLO%20Produce%20Exchange\">SLO Produce Exchange</a>\u00a0\u2014 home bakers and home growers swapping their goods twice a month</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Table%20Ware%20Share\">Table Ware Share</a> \u2014 borrow flatware for big events rather than buying landfill-filler</li>\n</ul>\n<h2>\n\tMostly Farm &amp; Garden</h2>\n<ul class=\"indent1\">\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Backyard%20Breeders\">Backyard Breeders</a> \u2014 breeding pets at home</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Community%20Gardens\">Community Gardens</a> \u2014 of which there are several</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"FarmBot\">FarmBot</a> \u2014 automating gardening and open-sourcing gardening expertise</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t(defunct?) <a href=\"Farmers%20Guild\">Farmers Guild</a> \u2014\u00a0where farmers can network and share resources with one another</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Firstfruits%20Farm\">Firstfruits Farm</a>\u00a0\u2014 grows the freshest organically grown fruits and vegetables for neighbors in need</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Four%20Elements%20Farm\">Four Elements Farm</a> \u2014 hosts permaculture design classes</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t(defunct) <a href=\"Fruit%20Squad\">Fruit Squad</a>\u00a0\u2014\u00a0a Cal Poly student project that connects the owners of fruit trees and vegetable gardens with happy, healthy consumers</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Growing%20Grounds%20Farm\">Growing Grounds Farm</a> \u2014 a non-profit wholesale nursery</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t(defunct) <a href=\"Home%20Farmer\">Home Farmer</a> \u2014 you can grow beautiful, organic produce at home</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t(defunct?) <a href=\"Poly%20Permaculture\">Poly Permaculture</a> \u2014</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"SLO%20Botanical%20Garden\">SLO Botanical Garden</a> \u2014 connecting people and plants</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"SLO%20Permaculture%20Guild\">SLO Permaculture Guild</a> \u2014</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"SLO%20Seed%20Exchange\">SLO Seed Exchange</a> \u2014 encourages the practice of cultivating and saving seeds</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t(defunct?) <a href=\"Terra%20Foundation\">Terra Foundation</a> \u2014 programs in deep ecology, permaculture design, and more</li>\n</ul>\n<h1>\n\t<a name=\"helping\"></a> People Helping People</h1>\n<ul>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"100%20%20Women%20Who%20Care\">100+ Women Who Care</a>\u00a0\u2014 pools charitable donations to make a large local impact</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"5%20Cities%20Homeless%20Coalition\">5 Cities Homeless Coalition</a>\u00a0\u2014\u00a0channeling community resources, volunteers, and donor assets to meet the needs of the homeless population through existing and new programs</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"50Now\">50Now</a>\u00a0\u2014\u00a0provides homes and crucial services for chronically homeless people</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Assistance%20League\">Assistance League</a> \u2014 clothing for schoolchildren in need</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"SLO%20Big%20Brothers%20Big%20Sisters\">SLO Big Brothers / Big Sisters</a>\u00a0\u2014 helps vulnerable children of single, low-income, and/or incarcerated parents succeed through one-to-one relationships</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"CASA\">CASA</a>\u00a0\u2014\u00a0advocates for the best interests of abused and neglected children within the court system</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Catholic%20Charities\">Catholic Charities</a> \u2014 family supportive services program</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Central%20Coast%20Assistive%20Technology%20Center\">Central Coast Assistive Technology Center</a> \u2014\u00a0assistive technology services and ergonomic training</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Central%20Coast%20Coalition%20for%20Undocumented%20Student%20Success\">Central Coast Coalition for Undocumented Student Success</a> \u2014\u00a0supports undocumented students in our region</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Central%20Coast%20Commission%20for%20Senior%20Citizens\">Central Coast Commission for Senior Citizens</a>\u00a0\u2014 funnels taxpayer money to various local programs for seniors</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Central%20Coast%20Community%20Volunteers\">Central Coast Community Volunteers</a>\u00a0\u2014 matches locals aged 50 and above with local volunteering opportunities</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"The%20Common%20Good\">The Common Good</a> \u2014 discover opportunities to do good locally</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Community%20Action%20Partnership\">Community Action Partnership</a>\u00a0\u2014 provides and/or coordinates services for financially struggling people in SLO county</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"ECHO\">ECHO</a> \u2014 El Camino Homeless Organization, a shelter located in Atascadero, with associated services</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Family%20Care%20Network%20Inc.\">Family Care Network Inc.</a>\u00a0\u2014\u00a0Serving children and families affected by trauma</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Habitat%20for%20Humanity\">Habitat for Humanity</a>\u00a0\u2014\u00a0builds and renovates homes to improve communities by partnering with families in need</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Hospice%20SLO\">Hospice SLO</a> \u2014 no one should have to face death, serious illness or grief by themselves</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"HSOC\">Homeless Services Oversight Council</a>\u00a0\u2014\u00a0ensure that everyone has access to appropriate and affordable housing</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Independent%20Living%20Resource%20Center\">Independent Living Resource Center</a>\u00a0\u2014\u00a0promotes independent living and full access for individuals with disabilities</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Life%20Steps%20Foundation\">Life Steps Foundation</a> \u2014 meets the health, psychological, and socioeconomic challenges of people who are experiencing mental, developmental, or physical disabilities</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Long%20Term%20Care%20Ombudsman\">Long Term Care Ombudsman</a>\u00a0\u2014 an advocate for the welfare of people living in nursing or residential care facilities</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Los%20Osos%20Cares\">Los Osos Cares</a> \u2014 food, health, housing, and transportation help for people in the Estero Bay community</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"LoveSLO\">Love SLO</a>\u00a0\u2014 a one-day event that matches a mass of volunteers with short-term volunteering needs</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Lumina\">Lumina</a> \u2014 <span>provides services to empower Central Coast residents impacted by sexual and intimate partner violence</span>\n\t\t<ul>\n\t\t\t<li>\n\t\t\t\t<a href=\"RISE\">RISE</a>\u00a0\u2014\u00a0provides crisis intervention and treatment to survivors of sexual and intimate partner violence and their loved ones (now part of <a href=\"Lumina\">Lumina</a>)</li>\n\t\t\t<li>\n\t\t\t\t<a href=\"Stand%20Strong\">Stand Strong</a>\u00a0\u2014 assists those local victims of domestic violence who are women (now part of <a href=\"Lumina\">Lumina</a>)</li>\n\t\t</ul>\n\t</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Morphe%20Project\">Morph Project</a> \u2014 helping women in crisis feel beautiful again</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"PathPoint\">PathPoint</a> \u2014 helps people with disabilities or mental health diagnoses to build life skills and develop meaningful relationships</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Prado%20Day%20Center\">Prado Day Center</a>\u00a0\u2014\u00a0the only day center serving the homeless population in the region</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Project%20Hope%20and%20Fairness\">Project Hope and Fairness</a>\u00a0\u2014 improves the economic and environmental sustainability of cocoa farmers</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Restorative%20Partners\">Restorative Partners</a>\u00a0\u2014 improving the lives of people impacted by the criminal justice system</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Shower%20the%20People\">Shower the People</a> and\u00a0<a href=\"Showers%20of%20Hope\">Showers of Hope</a>\u00a0\u2014 bring mobile shower trailers to homeless people to serve them where they live</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"SLO%20Red%20Cross\">SLO Red Cross</a>\u00a0\u2014\u00a0responds to disasters, provides lifesaving education, helps families prepare for emergencies, and keeps members of the Armed Forces connected with their loved ones</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"RSVP\">RSVP</a> \u2014 Retired and Senior Volunteer Program</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Senior%20Volunteer%20Services\">Senior Volunteer Services</a>\u00a0\u2014\u00a0promotes volunteer opportunities for mature adults &amp; matches their experience, knowledge, and expertise to serve local community needs</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"SLO%20Village\">SLO Village</a>\u00a0\u2014\u00a0empowers older adults to live happily, healthfully, and successfully in their own homes as they age</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Student%20Community%20Services\">Student Community Services</a> \u2014 community-oriented volunteer projects for Cal Poly students</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"The%20Teen's%20Closet\">The Teen's Closet</a>\u00a0\u2014\u00a0offers free clothing, school supplies, and basic resources for teen-sized youth</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Tri%20County%20GLAD\">Tri County GLAD</a>\u00a0\u2014 serves the deaf and hard of hearing</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Tri-Counties%20Regional%20Center\">Tri-Counties Regional Center</a> \u2014\u00a0provides lifelong services and supports for people with developmental disabilities</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"VolunteerSLO\">Volunteer SLO</a> \u2014 the volunteer resource for SLO County</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Womenade\">SLO Womenade</a>\u00a0<span style=\"\">\u2014 a\u00a0network that\u00a0</span><span style=\"\">donated items, time, and money to meet unmet financial essential needs in the county</span></li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Wilshire%20Community%20Services\">Wilshire Community Services</a> \u2014\u00a0offers a variety of services to older people</li>\n</ul>\n<h1>\n\t<a name=\"experiments\"></a> Sharing Economy Entrepreneurs &amp; Experiments</h1>\n<ul>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Bitcoin-enabled%20businesses\">Bitcoin-enabled businesses</a>\u00a0\u2014 allowing customers to use this innovative currency in \"meatspace\"</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Cal%20Coast%20Trade\">Cal Coast Trade</a> \u2014 local business barter network</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Central%20Coast%20Hour%20Exchange\">Central Coast Hour Exchange</a> \u2014 an alternative time-based currency</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"The%20Innovation%20Sandbox\">The Innovation Sandbox</a>\u00a0\u2014 helping Cal Poly students create inventions and start businesses</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Mama%20Ganache\">Mama Ganache</a>\u00a0\u2014 retailer of fair trade chocolates and financial supporter of Project Hope and Fairness</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t(defunct?) <a href=\"Cal%20Poly%20Net%20Impact\">Cal Poly Net Impact</a>\u00a0\u2014 infuses values of sustainability in the business culture</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"SCORE\">SCORE</a> \u2014 free and confidential small business counseling</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"SLO%20HotHouse\">SLO HotHouse</a> \u2014 co-working space</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Slow%20Money%20SLO\">Slow Money SLO</a> \u2014 a meaningful alternative to our current financial system that has run amok</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Softec\">Softec</a>\u00a0\u2014\u00a0advances business formation and growth in the technology sector</li>\n</ul>\n<h2>\n\tB-Corporations</h2>\n<ul class=\"indent1\">\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://athleta.gap.com/stores/ca/sanluisobispo/athleta-3404.html\">Athleta</a> \u2014 women's athletic clothing</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"FarmBot\">FarmBot.io</a> \u2014 open-source gardening technology</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.tenoverstudio.com/\">Ten Over Studio</a>\u00a0\u2014 architectural design</li>\n</ul>\n<h2>\n\tCredit Unions</h2>\n<ul class=\"indent1\">\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"CoastHills%20Credit%20Union\">CoastHills Credit Union</a></li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Golden%201%20Credit%20Union\">Golden 1 Credit Union</a></li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"SESLOC\">SESLOC</a></li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"SLO%20Credit%20Union\">SLO Credit Union</a></li>\n</ul>\n<h2>\n\tWorker-owned Cooperatives</h2>\n<ul class=\"indent1\">\n\t<li>\n\t\t(defunct?) <a href=\"Bike%20Delivery%20Cooperative\">Bike Delivery Cooperative</a> \u2014 greener, faster, cheaper local delivery</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t(defunct?) <a href=\"SloTech\">SloTech</a> \u2014 tech resources supporting the cooperative economy</li>\n</ul>\n<h2>\n\tCottage food producers</h2>\n<ul class=\"indent1\">\n\t<li>\n\t\t\u00a0\u2014\u00a0</li>\n</ul>\n<h2>\n\tRenewable and Off-the-Grid Energy Providers</h2>\n<ul class=\"indent1\">\n\t<li>\n\t\t\u00a0\u2014\u00a0</li>\n</ul>\n<h1>\n\t<a name=\"environment\"></a> Environmental Protection</h1>\n<ul>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Alliance%20for%20Nuclear%20Responsibility\">Alliance for Nuclear Responsibility</a>\u00a0\u2014 keeping a watchful eye on nuclear power and waste storage</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Bioneers\">Bioneers</a> \u2014 innovative solutions for healing our world</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"California%20Native%20Plant%20Society\">California Native Plant Society</a> \u2014 increase understanding and appreciation of native plants</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Coastkeeper\">Coastkeeper</a>\u00a0\u2014 defenders of the health of local waterways</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"SLO%20Clean%20Energy\">SLO Clean Energy</a>\u00a0\u2014 wants to offer local energy consumers the choice of a local energy provider</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Ecologistics\">Ecologistics</a> \u2014 creating a resilient and healthy community that is sustainable economically and environmentally</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"ECOSLO\">ECOSLO</a> \u2014 Environmental Center of SLO</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Empower%20Poly%20Coalition\">Empower Poly Coalition</a>\u00a0\u2014 an umbrella group of Cal Poly clubs concerned with sustainabiliy-related issues</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Guerrilla%20Gardening%20Club\">Guerrilla Gardening Club</a>\u00a0\u2014 advances ecological health through education and services</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Land%20Conservancy\">Land Conservancy</a> \u2014 prevent poorly planned development, protect water sources, restore habitat, &amp; promote family farms</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"One%20Cool%20Earth\">One Cool Earth</a> \u2014 a peaceful, abundant planet with a healthy environment for all through planting</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"PowerSave\">PowerSave Green Campus</a>\u00a0\u2014 makes sustainability improvements to Cal Poly buildings, programs, and activities</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"SLO%20Sierra%20Student%20Coalition\">SLO Sierra Student Coalition</a></li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Cal%20Poly%20Surfrider\">Cal Poly Surfrider</a>\u00a0\u2014\u00a0dedicated to the protection and enjoyment of oceans, beaches, and waves</li>\n</ul>\n<h1>\n\t<a name=\"commons\"></a> Commons and Public Spaces</h1>\n<ul>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Adopt-a-Road\">Adopt-a-Road</a>\u00a0\u2014 volunteers keeping county roads free from trash</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Bishop%20Peak%20Natural%20Reserve\">Bishop Peak Natural Reserve</a>\u00a0\u2014\u00a0the SLO open space that includes Bishop Peak</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"SLO%20county%20bike%20trails\">Bike Trails</a>\u00a0\u2014 there are a bunch, for road bikes and for mountain bikes</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"CCCMB\">Central Coast Concerned Mountain Bikers</a>\u00a0\u2014\u00a0organizes community members to maintain local mountain biking trails</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Deep%20Dark\">Deep Dark</a>\u00a0\u2014 a mysterious and storied subterranean adventure downtown</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Trails\">Hiking/Walking Trails</a>\u00a0\u2014\u00a0hiking and walking trails in the San Luis Obispo area</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Irish%20Hills\">Irish Hills</a>\u00a0\u2014\u00a0a city open space recreation area that is a popular hiking and mountain biking destination</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Laguna%20Lake\">Laguna Lake</a>\u00a0\u2014 the city's only lake</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Meadow%20Park%20Slacklining%20Area\">Meadow Park Slacklining Area</a>\u00a0\u2014 do your slacklining in the great outdoors</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Open%20Spaces\">Open Spaces</a>\u00a0\u2014 this land was made for you and me</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Parks\">Parks</a>\u00a0&amp; <a href=\"Beaches\">Beaches</a>\u00a0\u2014 great opportunities to stretch out and enjoy the outdoors</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Public%20Art\">Public Art</a>\u00a0and\u00a0<a href=\"Box%20Art\">Box Art</a>\u00a0\u2014 you don't have to go to a museum or gallery; there's art all around</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"SLOPOST\">SLOPOST</a>\u00a0\u2014\u00a0SLO Parks, Open Space, and Trails foundation</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"SLO%20Skate%20Park\">SLO Skate Park</a>\u00a0\u2014 a delight for the skateboard fanatic</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Streets\">Streets</a> &amp;\u00a0<a href=\"Alleys\">Alleys</a>\u00a0\u2014 the great avenues of the polis, is a grander way of putting it</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Surf%20Breaks\">Surf Breaks</a>\u00a0\u2014 where to go to catch a wave in the SLO neighborhood</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"The%20Mission%20Wall\">The Mission Wall</a>\u00a0\u2014 a place to work on your climbing chops, free, outdoors, in the middle of downtown SLO</li>\n</ul>\n<h1>\n\t<a name=\"education\"></a> Skills-Sharing &amp; Education</h1>\n<ul>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Child%20Development%20Resource%20Center\">Child Development Resource Center</a> \u2014 provides\u00a0child development and therapeutic interventions to strengthen families</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"CREEC%20Network\">CREEC Network</a>\u00a0\u2014\u00a0a clearinghouse of environmental education curriculum resources, professional development opportunities, events, programs, field trips, green school, and school garden efforts</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Family%20Care%20Network\">Family Care Network</a>\u00a0tutoring program \u2014 volunteers helping children learn</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Homeschoolers%20of%20the%20Central%20Coast\">Homeschoolers of the Central Coast</a> \u2014 local homeschoolers who meet and coordinate activities for their children</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Lifelong%20Learners%20of%20the%20Central%20Coast\">Lifelong Learners of the Central Coast</a> \u2014\u00a0provides enriching educational, personal growth, and cultural opportunities</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Literacy%20Council\">Literacy For Life</a>\u00a0\u2014\u00a0assists adult learners and their families develop English communication skills</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Little%20Free%20Libraries\">Little Free Libraries</a>\u00a0\u2014 free books in your neighborhood</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Outside%20Now\">Outside Now</a>\u00a0\u2014\u00a0offers nature-based educational programs</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"PPP%20Cooperative%20Preschool\">PPP Cooperative Preschool</a> \u2014 a school district program that runs with the active help of parents with enrolled children</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"San%20Luis%20Coastal%20Adult%20School\">San Luis Coastal Adult School</a> \u2014 empowering lifelong learners to reach their professional, personal, and family goals</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Children's%20Museum\">SLO Children\u2019s Museum</a> \u2014\u00a0a place for children to explore hands-on exhibits and programs</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"SLO%20Parks%20%26%20Recreation%20Classes\">SLO Parks &amp; Recreation classes</a> \u2014\u00a0classes for youth and adults in a variety of subjects</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"SLO%20Permaculture%20Design%20Course\">SLO Permaculture Design Course</a>\u00a0\u2014 a 72-hour whirlwind of permaculture education</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"SLO%20Transition%20Towns\">SLO Transition Towns</a> \u2014 hosting a \u201cReSkilling Expo\u201d</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Spokes\">Spokes</a> \u2014\u00a0trains and empowers nonprofits to fulfill their missions</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"SUSTAIN%20SLO\">SUSTAIN SLO</a> \u2014 learn together by designing and implementing\u00a0projects\u00a0that contribute to a thriving community</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Toastmasters\">Toastmasters</a>\u00a0\u2014\u00a0a peer-mentoring and practice group for people who want to improve their public speaking and leadership skills</li>\n</ul>\n<h1>\n\t<a name=\"groups\"></a> Neighborhood and Common Interest Groups</h1>\n<ul>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Cal%20Poly%20Ballroom%20Dance%20Club\">Cal Poly Ballroom Dance Club</a></li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Community%20Emergency%20Response%20Team\">Community Emergency Response Team</a> \u2014 learn basic preparedness and helpfulness skills for all types of disasters</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Cal%20Poly%20Fair%20Trade%20Club\">Cal Poly Fair Trade Club</a>\u00a0\u2014\u00a0seeking to promote fair and ethical trading practices</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Freeride%20and%20Sustainable%20Trails%20Association%20(FASTA)\">Freeride and Sustainable Trails Association</a>\u00a0\u2014\u00a0builds sustainable freeride trails on the Central Coast of California</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"GALA\">GALA</a>\u00a0\u2014\u00a0the Gay And Lesbian Alliance of the Central Coast</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"SeeClickFix\">SeeClickFix</a> \u2014 connects and engages citizens with city officials</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"SLOCO%20Seniors\">SLOCO Seniors</a> \u2014 a social support group for senior citizens</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Talking%20Back%3A%20A%20Feminist%20Collective\">Talking Back: A Feminist Collective</a>\u00a0\u2014\u00a0an informal feminist discussion group</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"TranzCentralCoast\">TranzCentralCoast</a> \u2014\u00a0supports the health and well-being of all members of the Transgender community</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Young%20Professionals%20Networking%20Group\">Young Professionals Networking Group</a>\u00a0\u2014\u00a0peer connection, support, and community involvement for local young professionals</li>\n</ul>\n<h2>\n\tReligious Groups</h2>\n<ul class=\"indent1\">\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Front%20Porch\">Front Porch</a> \u2014 it's a cafe, it's a Christian outreach opportunity, it's free of charge</li>\n</ul>\n<h2>\n\tSupport Groups</h2>\n<ul class=\"indent1\">\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Adult%20Children%20of%20Alcoholics\">Adult Children of Alcoholics</a></li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Alcoholics%20Anonymous\">Alcoholics Anonymous</a>\u00a0Central Coast Intergroup</li>\n</ul>\n<h2>\n\tFraternal Organizations</h2>\n<ul class=\"indent1\">\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Cacophony%20Society\">Cacophony Society</a>\u00a0\u2014\u00a0subverts the mundane and plays the knee-jerk reactions of the populace like a pipe organ</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Fraternities\">Fraternities</a>\u00a0\u2014 Cal Poly's communal living and mutual benefit societies</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Rotary\">Rotary</a> \u2014 fosters the ideal of service as a basis of worthy enterprise</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Xi%20Sigma%20Pi\">Xi Sigma Pi</a>\u00a0\u2014\u00a0Cal Poly's forestry honors society</li>\n</ul>\n<h1>\n\t<a name=\"health\"></a> Health &amp; Fitness</h1>\n<ul>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"AIDS%20Support%20Network\">Access Support Network</a>\u00a0\u2014\u00a0assisting our neighbors, friends and families who are living with HIV disease / AIDS or Hep-C</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Coast%20Caregiver%20Resource%20Center\">Coast Caregiver Resource Center</a>\u00a0\u2014 resources and assistance for people who care for people with brain injuries</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Community%20Counseling%20Center\">Community Counseling Center</a> \u2014\u00a0provides short-term, low-cost, professional counseling for individuals, couples and families who would not otherwise be able to afford it</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Community%20Health%20Centers\">Community Health Centers</a> \u2014\u00a0enhances the health status of people in the Central Coast of California, with special emphasis on the medically underserved</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Jack's%20Helping%20Hand\">Jack's Helping Hand</a> \u2014\u00a0provides community programs that meet the unique challenges of children with cancer or special needs</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Low-Cost%20Yoga\">Low-Cost Yoga</a>\u00a0\u2014 free and very-low-cost yoga classes in SLO</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Noor%20Foundation\">Noor Foundation</a> \u2014 high quality free healthcare to uninsured people living within our community</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Planned%20Parenthood\">Planned Parenthood</a>\u00a0\u2014\u00a0combines medical services with education and public advocacy to enhance the quality of life for individuals and their families</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Alpha%20Pregnancy%20%26%20Parenting%20Support\">Pregnancy &amp; Parenting Support\u00a0</a>\u00a0\u2014\u00a0provides free services for local women, their infants, and families during pregnancy and for a year after birth</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"RunFreeSLO\">RunFreeSLO</a>\u00a0\u2014\u00a0connects those who are experiencing \u200blife's challenges with the power of running</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Riso%20Family%20Loan%20Closet\">Riso Family Loan Closet</a>\u00a0\u2014\u00a0short-term loans of durable medical equipment</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"SLO%20Bangers\">SLO Bangers</a> \u2014 syringe-exchange program</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Transitions-Mental%20Health%20Association\">Transitions-Mental Health Association</a> \u2014\u00a0dedicated to eliminating stigma and promoting recovery and wellness for people with mental illness</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Vita%20Fitness%20Course\">Vita Fitness Course</a>\u00a0\u2014 a\u00a0course around Meadow Park that has stations set up for fitness exercises</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"YMCA\">YMCA</a> \u2014\u00a0helps you develop your mind, body, and spirit in a relaxed atmosphere that makes everyone feel comfortable and welcome</li>\n</ul>\n<h1>\n\t<a name=\"transit\"></a> Transportation</h1>\n<ul>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"SLO%20County%20Bicycle%20Coalition\">Bike SLO County</a> \u2014\u00a0transforms San Luis Obispo County into a safer and more livable community by promoting biking and walking</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Cal%20Poly%20Bicycle%20Coalition\">Cal Poly Bicycle Coalition</a> \u2014\u00a0promotes and advocates for a better pedestrian and bicycling atmosphere at Cal Poly</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Ride-On\">Ride-On</a> \u2014 provides door-to-door transportation 24 hours a day every day with advance reservations</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Rideshare\">Rideshare</a> \u2014\u00a0promotes alternative modes of transportation such as biking, carpooling, or taking the bus</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"SLO%20Safe%20Ride\">SLO Safe Ride</a> \u2014 facilitates safe transportation for people at events that facilitate inebriation</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"SLO%20Transit\">SLO Transit</a> \u2014 bus service in the San Luis Obispo area</li>\n</ul>\n<h1>\n\t<a name=\"media\"></a> Public &amp; Local Media</h1>\n<ul>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Amateur%20Radio\">Amateur Radio</a> \u2014 the local ham radio scene</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Blogs\">Blogs</a>\u00a0\u2014 do you know of a blog that covers the local scene? list it here.</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Cal%20Coast%20News\">Cal Coast News</a> \u2014 cranky, cantankerous, a thorn in the side of the local political establishment</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"HopeDance\">HopeDance</a> \u2014 a local take on the latest in the left-leaning idealistic harmonic convergence zeitgeist</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"KCBX\">KCBX</a> public radio \u2014 the local NPR affiliate</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"News%20by%20the%20People\">News by the People</a> \u2014 reporting contributed directly to this wiki</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"wikiSLO\">wikiSLO</a> \u2014 you\u2019re soaking in it</li>\n</ul>\n<h1>\n\t<a name=\"legal\"></a> Legal Assistance &amp; Mediation</h1>\n<ul>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"SLO%20ACLU\">SLO ACLU</a>\u00a0\u2014 protecting what's left of civil rights in America, locally</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"California%20Rural%20Legal%20Assistance\">California Rural Legal Assistance</a>\u00a0\u2014\u00a0a nonprofit legal services program that strives for economic justice and human rights on behalf of California's rural poor</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Creative%20Mediation\">Creative Mediation</a> \u2014\u00a0provides dispute resolution services to individuals and organizations as a low-cost alternative to filing a suit in court or to resolve suits already filed</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"SLO%20Legal%20Alternatives\">SLO Legal Assistance Foundation</a>\u00a0\u2014\u00a0provides and promotes affordable legal-aid services, assistance in self-representation, and conflict resolution for low and moderate income individuals</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"SLO%20Solutions\">SLO Solutions</a> \u2014\u00a0offers free conflict resolution services to all San Luis Obispo residents</li>\n</ul>\n<h1>\n\t<a name=\"events\"></a> Free Public Events and Activities</h1>\n<ul>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Concerts%20in%20the%20Plaza\">Concerts in the Plaza</a>\u00a0\u2014\u00a0a series of a free, two-hour Summer evening concerts in beautiful Mission Plaza</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Disc%20Golfing\">Disc Golfing</a>\u00a0\u2014 local, public disc golfing courses</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Free%20Events\">Free Events</a> \u2014 some of the many free events in the SLO area</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Geocaching\">Geocaching</a>\u00a0\u2014 a\u00a0GPS-based treasure hunt\u00a0for hidden containers containing some sort of surprise</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Lunchtime%20Bocce\">Lunchtime Bocce</a>\u00a0\u2014 free, Thursdays at noon, Emerson Park, all ages</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Write-A-Thon\">Write-A-Thon</a>\u00a0\u2014\u00a0spread the word and create content for this wiki</li>\n</ul>\n<h2>\n\tBike Events</h2>\n<ul class=\"indent1\">\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Bike%20Breakfasts\">Bike Breakfasts</a>\u00a0\u2014 a part of Rideshare's \"Bike Month\" that features free breakfasts for bicyclers</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Bike%20Happening\">Bike Happening</a>\u00a0\u2014\u00a0\u00a0a monthly night-time bike ride through downtown SLO on the first Thursday of every month</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Bike-in%20Movie\">Bike-in Movie</a>\u00a0\u2014 a free, family-friendly event put on by Rideshare as a part of Bike Month</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Bike%20Month\">Bike Month</a>\u00a0\u2014 an annual event celebrating bicycling in San Luis Obispo</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Full%20Moon%20Bike%20Rides\">Full Moon Bike Rides</a>\u00a0\u2014 if you know the right people, you\u2019ll be invited</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"SLO%20Little%20500\">Little 500</a>\u00a0\u2014\u00a0a bike race that happens a few times a year around the Terrace Hill Loop</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"SLO%20Tweed%20Ride\">Tweed Ride</a>\u00a0\u2014\u00a0a leisurely bike ride where cyclists are expected to dress in traditional early 20th century attire</li>\n</ul>\n<h1>\n\t<a name=\"housing\"></a>Housing</h1>\n<ul>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Community%20Living\">Community Living</a>\u00a0\u2014 communes, co-housing, and people who happen to share the same roof</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"HomeShare%20SLO\">HomeShare SLO</a>\u00a0\u2014 matches home providers (seniors with an extra room) with home seekers (people who need a room)</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Hope's%20Village\">Hope\u2019s Village</a> \u2014 providing sustainable community living for local unhoused adults</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"People's%20Self-Help%20Housing\">People's Self-Help Housing</a>\u00a0\u2014\u00a0provides affordable housing, home-ownership opportunities, and housing counseling services</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"RVs%20for%20Veterans\">RVs for Veterans</a>\u00a0\u2014\u00a0links donors of campers and other such inhabitable recreational vehicles with homeless veterans who need a place to live</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"SLO%20Housing%20Connection\">SLO Housing Connection</a>\u00a0\u2014\u00a0aids people who are homeless and have exhausted standard available resources</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"SLO%20Housing%20Trust%20Fund\">SLO Housing Trust Fund</a> \u2014\u00a0more affordable housing in San Luis Obispo County for low and moderate income households</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Sunny%20Acres%20(recovery%20housing)\">Sunny Acres</a>\u00a0\u2014\u00a0provides a clean and sober environment for those with drug and alcohol addictions</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"The%20Lavra\">The Lavra</a>\u00a0\u2014\u00a0an intentional community of people dedicated to discovering new ways of interdependent living</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Tiny%20House%20Consulting\">Tiny House Consulting</a> \u2014\u00a0getting tiny homes on wheels in SLO city backyards as housing for low income residents</li>\n</ul>\n<h1>\n\t<a name=\"misc\"></a> Miscellany</h1>\n<ul>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Animal%20Rescue%20Organizations\">Animal Rescue Organizations</a>\u00a0\u2014 shelters and rescue operations for animals</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Libraries\">Libraries</a>\u00a0\u2014 lending and research libraries of various sorts</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"SLO%20Friends%20of%20the%20Library\">SLO Friends of the Library</a>\u00a0\u2014 supports the local public library and boosts local literary awareness</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Community%20Foundation%20of%20SLO\">Community Foundation of SLO</a> \u2014\u00a0helps local donors establish, manage, and target charitable funds</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"Toy%20Lending%20Library\">Toy Lending Library</a>\u00a0\u2014\u00a0enrich children\u2019s experiences with age-appropriate toys</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"United%20Way%20of%20SLO\">United Way of SLO</a> \u2014\u00a0recruits people and organizations to build a stronger, healthier, more compassionate community</li>\n</ul>\n", "region": "https://ja.localwiki.org/api/v4/regions/219/", "history_comment": null, "history_date": "2021-07-23T16:22:45.592", "history_type": 1, "history_user": "https://ja.localwiki.org/api/v4/users/9703/", "history_user_ip": "2600:1700:1930:a180:5c1:8184:f4c7:950b" }, { "url": "https://ja.localwiki.org/api/v4/pages_history/1399269/", "name": "Great Western Power Station", "slug": "great western power station", "content": "<p>\n\t<span class=\"image_frame image_frame_border\"><img src=\"_files/Great%20Western%20Power%20Station.jpg\" style=\"width: 500px; height: 378px;\"><span style=\"width: 500px;\" class=\"image_caption\">Great Western Power Station, Oakland (circa 1930-1939)<sup>\u00a02,3</sup></span></span></p>\n<p>\n\tThe <strong>Great Western Power Station</strong> (aka the <strong>Park Boulevard Substation</strong>),\u00a0<span style=\"\">located at 3729 Park Boulevard, Oakland, was constructed by\u00a0</span>the <a href=\"Great%20Western%20Power%20Company\">Great Western Power Company</a>\u00a0in 1908, and expanded in 1909.<sup> 1</sup>\u00a0The building is located between what are now Grosvenor Place and Park Blvd, originally identified as Matthews Street and Fourth Avenue. <a href=\"Pacific%20Gas%20and%20Electric%20Company\">Pacific Gas and Electric Company</a>, which purchased Great Western in 1930, currently owns and operates the station.</p>\n<p>\n\tDespite being a commercial building owned by PG&amp;E, the property is within the boundaries of the <a href=\"Lakeshore%20Homes%20Association\">Lakeshore Homes Association</a>, making it the only non-residential property within the association. PG&amp;E is required to pay dues to the Association just like any other property owner. As of 2015, the dues were\u00a0$170 per property.</p>\n<h2>\n\tLinks and References</h2>\n<ol>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.newspapers.com/clip/82047517/electric-power-sub-station/\">Electric Power Sub - Station</a>\u00a0<em>Oakland Tribune</em> May 2, 1909</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\tImage(s) used by permission of the <a href=\"http://content.cdlib.org/ark:/13030/tf0x0nb2z4/?query=Great%20Western%20Power&amp;brand=calisphere\">UC Berkeley, Bancroft Library</a></li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"http://oac.cdlib.org/findaid/ark:/13030/tf1g5006hq/?&amp;brand=calisphere\">Views of Oakland, California</a>, Online Archive of California</li>\n</ol>\n<hr>\n<p>\n\t\u00a0</p>\n", "region": "https://ja.localwiki.org/api/v4/regions/340/", "history_comment": "removing dead link (after first checking the Wayback Machine)", "history_date": "2021-07-23T15:49:51.584", "history_type": 1, "history_user": "https://ja.localwiki.org/api/v4/users/9357/", "history_user_ip": "69.25.225.36" }, { "url": "https://ja.localwiki.org/api/v4/pages_history/1399268/", "name": "Helen Tanner Brodt", "slug": "helen tanner brodt", "content": "<p>\n\t<span class=\"image_frame image_frame_border image_right\"><img src=\"_files/NPS.jpg\" style=\"width: 300px; height: 375px;\"><span style=\"width: 300px;\" class=\"image_caption\">self portrait <sup>1</sup></span></span></p>\n<p>\n\t<strong>Helen Alice Tanner Brodt</strong> (April 21, 1838 \u2013 March 10, 1909) was an artist of some note, and the namesake of Lake Helen in Lassen Volcanic National Park. She's said to be the first white woman to climb the Mt. Lassen peak, and following the climb, expedition leader\u00a0Major Pierson B. Reading named the lake for her. She also taught art in the Oakland schools; her husband was educator <a href=\"A.W.%20Brodt\">Aurelius W. (\"A.W.\") Brodt</a>. <sup>1</sup></p>\n<h3>\n\tFamily</h3>\n<p>\n\tHelen Tanner was born in Elmira, New York, in 1838 to Joshua and Sarah Tanner. After attending the\u00a0National Academy of Design in New York City, she married A.W. Brodt in 1861, and they moved west to Red Bluff, California, in 1863. In August 1864, they were camping near Mt. Lassen when Major Reading's party spotted the smoke of their campfire. He invited them to join their climb, and on August 28, 1864, she became the first white woman to summit Mt. Lassen. <sup>1,2</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tHelen and A.W. had four children daughter <strong>Ethel Brodt</strong> (1865 \u2013 1947), son <strong>Paul W. Brodt</strong> (1868 \u2013 1946), daughter <strong>Wyntie Bogardus Brodt</strong> (1875 \u2013 1963), and son <strong>Shirley M. Brodt</strong> (1876 \u2013 1899). Ethel and Paul were born in Tehama County; Wyntie and Shirley were born in Oakland.</p>\n<h3>\n\tArt career</h3>\n<p>\n\t<span class=\"image_frame image_frame_border image_right\"><img src=\"_files/Mount_Shasta_viewed_through_trees_Helen_Tanner_Brodt.jpg\" style=\"width: 239px; height: 300px;\"><span style=\"width: 239px;\" class=\"image_caption\">pastels; Mt. Shasta through the trees by Helen Tanner Brodt<br>\n\tfrom UC Berkeley Bancroft Library</span></span></p>\n<p>\n\tTanner Brodt attended the National Academy of Design in New York City. After moving to Oakland, in 1867, she became the first art instructor of noted artist <a href=\"Arthur%20F.%20Mathews\">Arthur F. Mathews</a>. <sup>1</sup> Mathews was the brother of architect <a href=\"Walter%20J.%20Mathews\">Walter J. Mathews</a>.</p>\n<p>\n\tWhile she produced some landscapes, Tanner Brodt was best known for painting portraits. Several of her paintings and drawings are owned by the UC Berkeley Bancroft Library. The <a href=\"Oakland%20Museum%20of%20California\">Oakland Museum of California</a> also has some her art supplies, a watercolor tray and a box of pastels. <sup>3</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tOne of Tanner Brodt's better-known portraits was of abolitionist <a href=\"https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Brown_(abolitionist)\">John Brown</a>, which was painted in 1864 (apparently based on a well-known\u00a0daguerreotype), under the supervision of Mrs. Brown. <sup>5</sup> The painting was given to Storer College at Harper's Ferry, and may be hanging in the Harper's Ferry National Historical Park. <sup>5</sup> Another source says it's in the collection of the Smithsonian. <sup>6</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tKnown portraits include:</p>\n<ul>\n\t<li>\n\t\tself portrait</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\tAurelius W. Brodt</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\tJohn Brown</li>\n</ul>\n<h3>\n\tDeath and Burial</h3>\n<p>\n\tTanner Brodt died in Berkeley in 1909. After a funeral at the First Christian Church of Berkeley, her remains were interred at \"The Hights\", <a href=\"Joaquin%20Miller\">Joaquin Miller's</a> estate where <a href=\"Joaquin%20Miller%20Park\">Joaquin Miller Park</a> is now. <sup>4</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tThe Brodt's son Shirley was also interred there following his death in 1898.</p>\n<h2>\n\tLinks and References</h2>\n<ol>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.nps.gov/people/tanner-brodt.htm\">Helen Tanner Brodt</a> nps.gov</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://books.google.com/books?id=CXjPAAAAMAAJ&amp;lpg=PA488&amp;dq=a%20woman%20pioneer%20on%20lassen%20peak%20overland%20monthly&amp;pg=PA488#v=onepage&amp;q&amp;f=false\">A Woman Pioneer on Lassen's Peak</a> <em>Overland Monthly and Out West Magazine</em> November 1924</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"http://collections.museumca.org/?q=collection-item/a65173381\">watercolors A65.173.38.1</a>, <a href=\"http://collections.museumca.org/?q=collection-item/a65173382\">pastels A65.173.38.2</a> Gift of Virginia Perry Wilson, Oakland Museum of California</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.newspapers.com/clip/81984555/helen-tanner-brodt-funeral-interment/\">Aged Artist Buried Among Many Flowers</a> <em>Oakland Tribune</em> March 12, 1908</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.newspapers.com/clip/81986844/helen-tanner-brodt/\">Not in Napa Library</a> <em>Sacramento Bee</em> January 28, 1933</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"http://www.saratogahistory.com/History/sarah_brown.htm\">Sarah Brown, Artist and Abolitionist</a> Saratoga Historical Foundation</li>\n</ol>\n", "region": "https://ja.localwiki.org/api/v4/regions/340/", "history_comment": null, "history_date": "2021-07-23T15:49:43.935", "history_type": 1, "history_user": "https://ja.localwiki.org/api/v4/users/3242/", "history_user_ip": "108.245.190.192" }, { "url": "https://ja.localwiki.org/api/v4/pages_history/1399267/", "name": "Helen Tanner Brodt", "slug": "helen tanner brodt", "content": "<p>\n\t<span class=\"image_frame image_frame_border image_right\"><img src=\"_files/NPS.jpg\" style=\"width: 300px; height: 375px;\"><span style=\"width: 300px;\" class=\"image_caption\">self portrait <sup>1</sup></span></span></p>\n<p>\n\t<strong>Helen Alice Tanner Brodt</strong> (April 21, 1838 \u2013 March 10, 1909) was an artist of some note, and the namesake of Lake Helen in Lassen Volcanic National Park. She's said to be the first white woman to climb the Mt. Lassen peak, and following the climb, expedition leader\u00a0Major Pierson B. Reading named the lake for her. She also taught art in the Oakland schools; her husband was educator <a href=\"A.W.%20Brodt\">Aurelius W. (\"A.W.\") Brodt</a>. <sup>1</sup></p>\n<h3>\n\tFamily</h3>\n<p>\n\tHelen Tanner was born in Elmira, New York, in 1838 to Joshua and Sarah Tanner. She attended the\u00a0National Academy of Design in New York City. She married A.W. Brodt in 1861, and they moved west to Red Bluff, California, in 1863. In August 1864, they were camping near Mt. Lassen when Major Reading's party spotted the smoke of their campfire. He invited them to join their climb, and on August 28, 1864, she became the first white woman to summit Mt. Lassen. <sup>1,2</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tHelen and A.W. had four children daughter <strong>Ethel Brodt</strong> (1865 \u2013 1947), son <strong>Paul W. Brodt</strong> (1868 \u2013 1946), daughter <strong>Wyntie Bogardus Brodt</strong> (1875 \u2013 1963), and son <strong>Shirley M. Brodt</strong> (1876 \u2013 1899). Ethel and Paul were born in Tehama County; Wyntie and Shirley were born in Oakland.</p>\n<h3>\n\tArt career</h3>\n<p>\n\t<span class=\"image_frame image_frame_border image_right\"><img src=\"_files/Mount_Shasta_viewed_through_trees_Helen_Tanner_Brodt.jpg\" style=\"width: 239px; height: 300px;\"><span style=\"width: 239px;\" class=\"image_caption\">pastels; Mt. Shasta through the trees by Helen Tanner Brodt<br>\n\tfrom UC Berkeley Bancroft Library</span></span></p>\n<p>\n\tTanner Brodt attended the National Academy of Design in New York City. After moving to Oakland, in 1867, she became the first art instructor of noted artist <a href=\"Arthur%20F.%20Mathews\">Arthur F. Mathews</a>. <sup>1</sup> Mathews was the brother of architect <a href=\"Walter%20J.%20Mathews\">Walter J. Mathews</a>.</p>\n<p>\n\tWhile she produced some landscapes, Tanner Brodt was best known for painting portraits. Several of her paintings and drawings are owned by the UC Berkeley Bancroft Library. The <a href=\"Oakland%20Museum%20of%20California\">Oakland Museum of California</a> also has some her art supplies, a watercolor tray and a box of pastels. <sup>3</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tOne of Tanner Brodt's better-known portraits was of abolitionist <a href=\"https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Brown_(abolitionist)\">John Brown</a>, which was painted in 1864 (apparently based on a well-known\u00a0daguerreotype), under the supervision of Mrs. Brown. <sup>5</sup> The painting was given to Storer College at Harper's Ferry, and may be hanging in the Harper's Ferry National Historical Park. <sup>5</sup> Another source says it's in the collection of the Smithsonian. <sup>6</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tKnown portraits include:</p>\n<ul>\n\t<li>\n\t\tself portrait</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\tAurelius W. Brodt</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\tJohn Brown</li>\n</ul>\n<h3>\n\tDeath and Burial</h3>\n<p>\n\tTanner Brodt died in Berkeley in 1909. After a funeral at the First Christian Church of Berkeley, her remains were interred at \"The Hights\", <a href=\"Joaquin%20Miller\">Joaquin Miller's</a> estate where <a href=\"Joaquin%20Miller%20Park\">Joaquin Miller Park</a> is now. <sup>4</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tThe Brodt's son Shirley was also interred there following his death in 1898.</p>\n<h2>\n\tLinks and References</h2>\n<ol>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.nps.gov/people/tanner-brodt.htm\">Helen Tanner Brodt</a> nps.gov</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://books.google.com/books?id=CXjPAAAAMAAJ&amp;lpg=PA488&amp;dq=a%20woman%20pioneer%20on%20lassen%20peak%20overland%20monthly&amp;pg=PA488#v=onepage&amp;q&amp;f=false\">A Woman Pioneer on Lassen's Peak</a> <em>Overland Monthly and Out West Magazine</em> November 1924</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"http://collections.museumca.org/?q=collection-item/a65173381\">watercolors A65.173.38.1</a>, <a href=\"http://collections.museumca.org/?q=collection-item/a65173382\">pastels A65.173.38.2</a> Gift of Virginia Perry Wilson, Oakland Museum of California</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.newspapers.com/clip/81984555/helen-tanner-brodt-funeral-interment/\">Aged Artist Buried Among Many Flowers</a> <em>Oakland Tribune</em> March 12, 1908</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.newspapers.com/clip/81986844/helen-tanner-brodt/\">Not in Napa Library</a> <em>Sacramento Bee</em> January 28, 1933</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"http://www.saratogahistory.com/History/sarah_brown.htm\">Sarah Brown, Artist and Abolitionist</a> Saratoga Historical Foundation</li>\n</ol>\n", "region": "https://ja.localwiki.org/api/v4/regions/340/", "history_comment": null, "history_date": "2021-07-23T15:48:52.084", "history_type": 1, "history_user": "https://ja.localwiki.org/api/v4/users/3242/", "history_user_ip": "108.245.190.192" }, { "url": "https://ja.localwiki.org/api/v4/pages_history/1399266/", "name": "Great Western Power Station", "slug": "great western power station", "content": "<p>\n\t<span class=\"image_frame image_frame_border\"><img src=\"_files/Great%20Western%20Power%20Station.jpg\" style=\"width: 500px; height: 378px;\"><span style=\"width: 500px;\" class=\"image_caption\">Great Western Power Station, Oakland (circa 1930-1939)<sup>\u00a02,3</sup></span></span></p>\n<p>\n\tThe <strong>Great Western Power Station</strong> (aka the <strong>Park Boulevard Substation</strong>),\u00a0<span style=\"\">located at 3729 Park Boulevard, Oakland, was constructed by\u00a0</span>the <a href=\"Great%20Western%20Power%20Company\">Great Western Power Company</a>\u00a0in 1908, and expanded in 1909.<sup> 1</sup>\u00a0The building is located between what are now Grosvenor Place and Park Blvd, originally identified as Matthews Street and Fourth Avenue. <a href=\"Pacific%20Gas%20and%20Electric%20Company\">Pacific Gas and Electric Company</a>, which purchased Great Western in 1930, currently owns and operates the station.</p>\n<p>\n\tDespite being a commercial building owned by PG&amp;E, the property is within the boundaries of the <a href=\"Lakeshore%20Homes%20Association\">Lakeshore Homes Association</a>, making it the only non-residential property within the association. PG&amp;E is required to pay dues to the Association just like any other property owner. As of 2015, the dues were\u00a0$170 per property.</p>\n<h2>\n\tLinks and References</h2>\n<ol>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.newspapers.com/clip/82047517/electric-power-sub-station/\">Electric Power Sub - Station</a>\u00a0<em>Oakland Tribune</em> May 2, 1909</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\tImage(s) used by permission of the <a href=\"http://content.cdlib.org/ark:/13030/tf0x0nb2z4/?query=Great%20Western%20Power&amp;brand=calisphere\">UC Berkeley, Bancroft Library</a></li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"http://oac.cdlib.org/findaid/ark:/13030/tf1g5006hq/?&amp;brand=calisphere\">Views of Oakland, California</a>, Online Archive of California</li>\n</ol>\n<ul>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/stamp/stamp.jsp?arnumber=06537284\">Membership - Applications, Elections, Transfers, Etc.</a>\u00a0 (1926)</li>\n</ul>\n<hr>\n<p>\n\t\u00a0</p>\n", "region": "https://ja.localwiki.org/api/v4/regions/340/", "history_comment": "Much older than I thought", "history_date": "2021-07-23T15:42:53.542", "history_type": 1, "history_user": "https://ja.localwiki.org/api/v4/users/9357/", "history_user_ip": "69.25.225.36" }, { "url": "https://ja.localwiki.org/api/v4/pages_history/1399265/", "name": "Helen Tanner Brodt", "slug": "helen tanner brodt", "content": "<p>\n\t<span class=\"image_frame image_frame_border image_right\"><img src=\"_files/NPS.jpg\" style=\"width: 300px; height: 375px;\"><span style=\"width: 300px;\" class=\"image_caption\">self portrait <sup>1</sup></span></span></p>\n<p>\n\t<strong>Helen Alice Tanner Brodt</strong> (April 21, 1838 \u2013 March 10, 1909) was an artist of some note, and the namesake of Lake Helen in Lassen Volcanic National Park. She's said to be the first white woman to climb the Mt. Lassen peak, and following the climb, expedition leader\u00a0Major Pierson B. Reading named the lake for her. She also taught art in the Oakland schools; her husband was educator <a href=\"A.W.%20Brodt\">Aurelius W. (\"A.W.\") Brodt</a>. <sup>1</sup></p>\n<h3>\n\tFamily</h3>\n<p>\n\tHelen Tanner was born in Elmira, New York, in 1838 to Joshua and Sarah Tanner. She attended the\u00a0National Academy of Design in New York City. She married A.W. Brodt in 1861, and they moved west to Red Bluff, California, in 1863. In August 1864, they were camping near Mt. Lassen when Major Reading's party spotted the smoke of their campfire. He invited them to join their climb, and on August 28, 1864, she became the first white woman to summit Mt. Lassen. <sup>1,2</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tHelen and A.W. had four children daughter <strong>Ethel Brodt</strong> (1865 \u2013 1947), son <strong>Paul W. Brodt</strong> (1868 \u2013 1946), daughter <strong>Wyntie Bogardus Brodt</strong> (1875 \u2013 1963), and son <strong>Shirley M. Brodt</strong> (1876 \u2013 1899). Ethel and Paul were born in Tehama County; Wyntie and Shirley were born in Oakland.</p>\n<h3>\n\tArt career</h3>\n<p>\n\t<span class=\"image_frame image_frame_border image_right\"><img src=\"_files/Mount_Shasta_viewed_through_trees_Helen_Tanner_Brodt.jpg\" style=\"width: 239px; height: 300px;\"><span style=\"width: 239px;\" class=\"image_caption\">pastels; Mt. Shasta through the trees by Helen Tanner Brodt<br>\n\tfrom UC Berkeley Bancroft Library</span></span></p>\n<p>\n\tTanner Brodt attended the National Academy of Design in New York City. After moving to Oakland, in 1867, she became the first art instructor of noted artist <a href=\"Arthur%20F.%20Mathews\">Arthur F. Mathews</a>. <sup>1</sup> Mathews was the brother of architect <a href=\"Walter%20J.%20Mathews\">Walter J. Mathews</a>.</p>\n<p>\n\tWhile she produced some landscapes, Tanner Brodt was best known for painting portraits. Several of her paintings and drawings are owned by the UC Berkeley Bancroft Library. The <a href=\"Oakland%20Museum%20of%20California\">Oakland Museum of California</a> also has some her art supplies, a watercolor tray and a box of pastels. <sup>3</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tOne of Tanner Brodt's better-known portraits was of abolitionist <a href=\"https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Brown_(abolitionist)\">John Brown</a>, which was painted in 1864 (apparently based on a well-known\u00a0daguerreotype), under the supervision of Mrs. Brown. <sup>5</sup> The painting was given to Storer College at Harper's Ferry, and may be hanging in the Harper's Ferry National Historical Park. <sup>5</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tKnown portraits include:</p>\n<ul>\n\t<li>\n\t\tself portrait</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\tAurelius W. Brodt</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\tJohn Brown</li>\n</ul>\n<h3>\n\tDeath and Burial</h3>\n<p>\n\tTanner Brodt died in Berkeley in 1909. After a funeral at the First Christian Church of Berkeley, her remains were interred at \"The Hights\", <a href=\"Joaquin%20Miller\">Joaquin Miller's</a> estate where <a href=\"Joaquin%20Miller%20Park\">Joaquin Miller Park</a> is now. <sup>4</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tThe Brodt's son Shirley was also interred there following his death in 1898.</p>\n<h2>\n\tLinks and References</h2>\n<ol>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.nps.gov/people/tanner-brodt.htm\">Helen Tanner Brodt</a> nps.gov</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://books.google.com/books?id=CXjPAAAAMAAJ&amp;lpg=PA488&amp;dq=a%20woman%20pioneer%20on%20lassen%20peak%20overland%20monthly&amp;pg=PA488#v=onepage&amp;q&amp;f=false\">A Woman Pioneer on Lassen's Peak</a> <em>Overland Monthly and Out West Magazine</em> November 1924</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"http://collections.museumca.org/?q=collection-item/a65173381\">watercolors A65.173.38.1</a>, <a href=\"http://collections.museumca.org/?q=collection-item/a65173382\">pastels A65.173.38.2</a> Gift of Virginia Perry Wilson, Oakland Museum of California</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.newspapers.com/clip/81984555/helen-tanner-brodt-funeral-interment/\">Aged Artist Buried Among Many Flowers</a> <em>Oakland Tribune</em> March 12, 1908</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.newspapers.com/clip/81986844/helen-tanner-brodt/\">Not in Napa Library</a> <em>Sacramento Bee</em> January 28, 1933</li>\n</ol>\n", "region": "https://ja.localwiki.org/api/v4/regions/340/", "history_comment": null, "history_date": "2021-07-23T15:15:53.284", "history_type": 1, "history_user": "https://ja.localwiki.org/api/v4/users/3242/", "history_user_ip": "108.245.190.192" }, { "url": "https://ja.localwiki.org/api/v4/pages_history/1399264/", "name": "Helen Tanner Brodt", "slug": "helen tanner brodt", "content": "<p>\n\t<span class=\"image_frame image_frame_border image_right\"><img src=\"_files/NPS.jpg\" style=\"width: 300px; height: 375px;\"><span style=\"width: 300px;\" class=\"image_caption\">self portrait <sup>1</sup></span></span></p>\n<p>\n\t<strong>Helen Alice Tanner Brodt</strong> (April 21, 1838 \u2013 March 10, 1909) was an artist of some note, and the namesake of Lake Helen in Lassen Volcanic National Park. She's said to be the first white woman to climb the Mt. Lassen peak, and following the climb, expedition leader\u00a0Major Pierson B. Reading named the lake for her. She also taught art in the Oakland schools; her husband was educator <a href=\"A.W.%20Brodt\">Aurelius W. (\"A.W.\") Brodt</a>. <sup>1</sup></p>\n<h3>\n\tFamily</h3>\n<p>\n\tHelen Tanner was born in Elmira, New York, in 1838 to Joshua and Sarah Tanner. She attended the\u00a0National Academy of Design in New York City. She married A.W. Brodt in 1861, and they moved west to Red Bluff, California, in 1863. In August 1864, they were camping near Mt. Lassen when Major Reading's party spotted the smoke of their campfire. He invited them to join their climb, and on August 28, 1864, she became the first white woman to summit Mt. Lassen. <sup>1,2</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tHelen and A.W. had four children daughter <strong>Ethel Brodt</strong> (1865 \u2013 1947), son <strong>Paul W. Brodt</strong> (1868 \u2013 1946), daughter <strong>Wyntie Bogardus Brodt</strong> (1875 \u2013 1963), and son <strong>Shirley M. Brodt</strong> (1876 \u2013 1899). Ethel and Paul were born in Tehama County; Wyntie and Shirley were born in Oakland.</p>\n<h3>\n\tArt career</h3>\n<p>\n\tTanner Brodt attended the National Academy of Design in New York City. After moving to Oakland, in 1867, she became the first art instructor of noted artist <a href=\"Arthur%20F.%20Mathews\">Arthur F. Mathews</a>. <sup>1</sup> Mathews was the brother of architect <a href=\"Walter%20J.%20Mathews\">Walter J. Mathews</a>.</p>\n<p>\n\tWhile she painted some landscapes, Tanner Brodt was best known for painting portraits. Several of her paintings are owned by the UC Berkeley Bancroft Library. The <a href=\"Oakland%20Museum%20of%20California\">Oakland Museum of California</a> also has some her art supplies, a watercolor tray and a box of pastels. <sup>3</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tOne of Tanner Brodt's better-known portraits was of abolitionist <a href=\"https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Brown_(abolitionist)\">John Brown</a>, which was painted in 1864 (apparently based on a well-known\u00a0daguerreotype), under the supervision of Mrs. Brown. <sup>5</sup> The painting was given to Storer College at Harper's Ferry, and may be hanging in the Harper's Ferry National Historical Park. <sup>5</sup></p>\n<h3>\n\tDeath and Burial</h3>\n<p>\n\tTanner Brodt died in Berkeley in 1909. After a funeral at the First Christian Church of Berkeley, her remains were interred at \"The Hights\", <a href=\"Joaquin%20Miller\">Joaquin Miller's</a> estate where <a href=\"Joaquin%20Miller%20Park\">Joaquin Miller Park</a> is now. <sup>4</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tThe Brodt's son Shirley was also interred there following his death in 1898.</p>\n<h2>\n\tLinks and References</h2>\n<ol>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.nps.gov/people/tanner-brodt.htm\">Helen Tanner Brodt</a> nps.gov</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://books.google.com/books?id=CXjPAAAAMAAJ&amp;lpg=PA488&amp;dq=a%20woman%20pioneer%20on%20lassen%20peak%20overland%20monthly&amp;pg=PA488#v=onepage&amp;q&amp;f=false\">A Woman Pioneer on Lassen's Peak</a> <em>Overland Monthly and Out West Magazine</em> November 1924</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"http://collections.museumca.org/?q=collection-item/a65173381\">watercolors A65.173.38.1</a>, <a href=\"http://collections.museumca.org/?q=collection-item/a65173382\">pastels A65.173.38.2</a> Gift of Virginia Perry Wilson, Oakland Museum of California</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.newspapers.com/clip/81984555/helen-tanner-brodt-funeral-interment/\">Aged Artist Buried Among Many Flowers</a> <em>Oakland Tribune</em> March 12, 1908</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.newspapers.com/clip/81986844/helen-tanner-brodt/\">Not in Napa Library</a> <em>Sacramento Bee</em> January 28, 1933</li>\n</ol>\n", "region": "https://ja.localwiki.org/api/v4/regions/340/", "history_comment": null, "history_date": "2021-07-23T12:40:56.601", "history_type": 1, "history_user": "https://ja.localwiki.org/api/v4/users/3242/", "history_user_ip": "108.245.190.192" }, { "url": "https://ja.localwiki.org/api/v4/pages_history/1399263/", "name": "Helen Tanner Brodt", "slug": "helen tanner brodt", "content": "<p>\n\t<span class=\"image_frame image_frame_border image_right\"><img src=\"_files/NPS.jpg\" style=\"width: 300px; height: 375px;\"><span style=\"width: 300px;\" class=\"image_caption\">self portrait <sup>1</sup></span></span></p>\n<p>\n\t<strong>Helen Alice Tanner Brodt</strong> (April 21, 1838 \u2013 March 10, 1909) was an artist of some note, and the namesake of Lake Helen in Lassen Volcanic National Park. She's said to be the first white woman to climb the Mt. Lassen peak, and following the climb, expedition leader\u00a0Major Pierson B. Reading named the lake for her. She also taught art in the Oakland schools; her husband was educator <a href=\"A.W.%20Brodt\">Aurelius W. (\"A.W.\") Brodt</a>. <sup>1</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tHelen Tanner was born in Elmira, New York, in 1838 to Joshua and Sarah Tanner. She attended the\u00a0National Academy of Design in New York City. She married A.W. Brodt in 1861, and they moved west to Red Bluff, California, in 1863. In August 1864, they were camping near Mt. Lassen when Major Reading's party spotted the smoke of their campfire. He invited them to join their climb, and on August 28, 1864, she became the first white woman to summit Mt. Lassen. <sup>1,2</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tHelen and A.W. had four children daughter <strong>Ethel Brodt</strong> (1865 \u2013 1947), son <strong>Paul W. Brodt</strong> (1868 \u2013 1946), daughter <strong>Wyntie Bogardus Brodt</strong> (1875 \u2013 1963), and son <strong>Shirley M. Brodt</strong> (1876 \u2013 1899). Ethel and Paul were born in Tehama County; Wyntie and Shirley were born in Oakland.</p>\n<h3>\n\tArt career</h3>\n<p>\n\tTanner Brodt attended the National Academy of Design in New York City. After moving to Oakland, in 1867, she became the first art instructor of noted artist <a href=\"Arthur%20F.%20Mathews\">Arthur F. Mathews</a>. <sup>1</sup> Mathews was the brother of architect <a href=\"Walter%20J.%20Mathews\">Walter J. Mathews</a>.</p>\n<p>\n\tWhile she painted some landscapes, Tanner Brodt was best known for painting portraits. Several of her paintings are owned by the UC Berkeley Bancroft Library. The <a href=\"Oakland%20Museum%20of%20California\">Oakland Museum of California</a> also has some her art supplies, a watercolor tray and a box of pastels. <sup>3</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tOne of Tanner Brodt's better-known portraits was of abolitionist <a href=\"https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Brown_(abolitionist)\">John Brown</a>, which was painted in 1864 (apparently based on a well-known\u00a0daguerreotype), under the supervision of Mrs. Brown. <sup>5</sup> The painting was given to Storer College at Harper's Ferry, and may be hanging in the Harper's Ferry National Historical Park. <sup>5</sup></p>\n<h3>\n\tDeath and Burial</h3>\n<p>\n\tTanner Brodt died in Berkeley in 1909. After a funeral at the First Christian Church of Berkeley, her remains were interred at \"The Hights\", <a href=\"Joaquin%20Miller\">Joaquin Miller's</a> estate where <a href=\"Joaquin%20Miller%20Park\">Joaquin Miller Park</a> is now. <sup>4</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tThe Brodt's son Shirley was also interred there following his death in 1898.</p>\n<h2>\n\tLinks and References</h2>\n<ol>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.nps.gov/people/tanner-brodt.htm\">Helen Tanner Brodt</a> nps.gov</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://books.google.com/books?id=CXjPAAAAMAAJ&amp;lpg=PA488&amp;dq=a%20woman%20pioneer%20on%20lassen%20peak%20overland%20monthly&amp;pg=PA488#v=onepage&amp;q&amp;f=false\">A Woman Pioneer on Lassen's Peak</a> <em>Overland Monthly and Out West Magazine</em> November 1924</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"http://collections.museumca.org/?q=collection-item/a65173381\">watercolors A65.173.38.1</a>, <a href=\"http://collections.museumca.org/?q=collection-item/a65173382\">pastels A65.173.38.2</a> Gift of Virginia Perry Wilson, Oakland Museum of California</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.newspapers.com/clip/81984555/helen-tanner-brodt-funeral-interment/\">Aged Artist Buried Among Many Flowers</a> <em>Oakland Tribune</em> March 12, 1908</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.newspapers.com/clip/81986844/helen-tanner-brodt/\">Not in Napa Library</a> <em>Sacramento Bee</em> January 28, 1933</li>\n</ol>\n", "region": "https://ja.localwiki.org/api/v4/regions/340/", "history_comment": null, "history_date": "2021-07-23T12:40:01.688", "history_type": 1, "history_user": "https://ja.localwiki.org/api/v4/users/3242/", "history_user_ip": "108.245.190.192" }, { "url": "https://ja.localwiki.org/api/v4/pages_history/1399262/", "name": "Helen Tanner Brodt", "slug": "helen tanner brodt", "content": "<p>\n\t<span class=\"image_frame image_frame_border image_right\"><img src=\"_files/NPS.jpg\" style=\"width: 300px; height: 375px;\"><span style=\"width: 300px;\" class=\"image_caption\">self portrait <sup>1</sup></span></span></p>\n<p>\n\t<strong>Helen Alice Tanner Brodt</strong> (April 21, 1838 \u2013 March 10, 1909) was an artist of some note, and the namesake of Lake Helen in Lassen Volcanic National Park. She's said to be the first white woman to climb the Mt. Lassen peak, and following the climb, expedition leader\u00a0Major Pierson B. Reading named the lake for her. She also taught art in the Oakland schools; her husband was educator <a href=\"A.W.%20Brodt\">Aurelius W. (\"A.W.\") Brodt</a>. <sup>1</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tHelen Tanner was born in Elmira, New York, in 1838 to Joshua and Sarah Tanner. She attended the\u00a0National Academy of Design in New York City. She married A.W. Brodt in 1861, and they moved west to Red Bluff, California, in 1863. In August 1864, she and Aurelius were camping near Mt. Lassen when Major Reading's party spotted the smoke of their campfire. He invited them to join their climb, and on August 28, 1864, she became the first white woman to summit Mt. Lassen. <sup>1,2</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tHelen and A.W. had four children daughter <strong>Ethel Brodt</strong> (1865 \u2013 1947), son <strong>Paul W. Brodt</strong> (1868 \u2013 1946), daughter <strong>Wyntie Bogardus Brodt</strong> (1875 \u2013 1963), and son <strong>Shirley M. Brodt</strong> (1876 \u2013 1899). Ethel and Paul were born in Tehama County; Wyntie and Shirley were born in Oakland.</p>\n<h3>\n\tArt career</h3>\n<p>\n\tTanner Brodt attended the National Academy of Design in New York City. After moving to Oakland, in 1867, she became the first art instructor of noted artist <a href=\"Arthur%20F.%20Mathews\">Arthur F. Mathews</a>. <sup>1</sup> Mathews was the brother of architect <a href=\"Walter%20J.%20Mathews\">Walter J. Mathews</a>.</p>\n<p>\n\tWhile she painted some landscapes, Tanner Brodt was best known for painting portraits. Several of her paintings are owned by the UC Berkeley Bancroft Library. The <a href=\"Oakland%20Museum%20of%20California\">Oakland Museum of California</a> also has some her art supplies, a watercolor tray and a box of pastels. <sup>3</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tOne of Tanner Brodt's better-known portraits was of abolitionist <a href=\"https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Brown_(abolitionist)\">John Brown</a>, which was painted in 1864 (apparently based on a well-known\u00a0daguerreotype), under the supervision of Mrs. Brown. <sup>5</sup> The painting was given to Storer College at Harper's Ferry, and may be hanging in the Harper's Ferry National Historical Park. <sup>5</sup></p>\n<h3>\n\tDeath and Burial</h3>\n<p>\n\tTanner Brodt died in Berkeley in 1909. After a funeral at the First Christian Church of Berkeley, her remains were interred at \"The Hights\", <a href=\"Joaquin%20Miller\">Joaquin Miller's</a> estate where <a href=\"Joaquin%20Miller%20Park\">Joaquin Miller Park</a> is now. <sup>4</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tThe Brodt's son Shirley was also interred there following his death in 1898.</p>\n<h2>\n\tLinks and References</h2>\n<ol>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.nps.gov/people/tanner-brodt.htm\">Helen Tanner Brodt</a> nps.gov</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://books.google.com/books?id=CXjPAAAAMAAJ&amp;lpg=PA488&amp;dq=a%20woman%20pioneer%20on%20lassen%20peak%20overland%20monthly&amp;pg=PA488#v=onepage&amp;q&amp;f=false\">A Woman Pioneer on Lassen's Peak</a> <em>Overland Monthly and Out West Magazine</em> November 1924</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"http://collections.museumca.org/?q=collection-item/a65173381\">watercolors A65.173.38.1</a>, <a href=\"http://collections.museumca.org/?q=collection-item/a65173382\">pastels A65.173.38.2</a> Gift of Virginia Perry Wilson, Oakland Museum of California</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.newspapers.com/clip/81984555/helen-tanner-brodt-funeral-interment/\">Aged Artist Buried Among Many Flowers</a> <em>Oakland Tribune</em> March 12, 1908</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.newspapers.com/clip/81986844/helen-tanner-brodt/\">Not in Napa Library</a> <em>Sacramento Bee</em> January 28, 1933</li>\n</ol>\n", "region": "https://ja.localwiki.org/api/v4/regions/340/", "history_comment": "saving", "history_date": "2021-07-23T12:38:46.015", "history_type": 1, "history_user": "https://ja.localwiki.org/api/v4/users/3242/", "history_user_ip": "108.245.190.192" }, { "url": "https://ja.localwiki.org/api/v4/pages_history/1399261/", "name": "Helen Tanner Brodt", "slug": "helen tanner brodt", "content": "<p>\n\t<span class=\"image_frame image_frame_border image_right\"><img src=\"_files/NPS.jpg\" style=\"width: 300px; height: 375px;\"><span style=\"width: 300px;\" class=\"image_caption\">self portrait <sup>1</sup></span></span></p>\n<p>\n\t<strong>Helen Alice Tanner Brodt</strong> (April 21, 1838 \u2013 March 10, 1909) was an artist of some note, and the namesake of Lake Helen in Lassen Volcanic National Park. She's said to be the first white woman to climb the Mt. Lassen peak, and following the climb, expedition leader\u00a0Major Pierson B. Reading named the lake for her. She also taught art in the Oakland schools; her husband was educator <a href=\"A.W.%20Brodt\">Aurelius W. (\"A.W.\") Brodt</a>. <sup>1</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tHelen Tanner was born in Elmira, New York, in 1838 to Joshua and Sarah Tanner. She attended the\u00a0National Academy of Design in New York City. She married A.W. Brodt in 1861, and they moved west to Red Bluff, California, in 1863. In August 1864, she and Aurelius were camping near Mt. Lassen when Major Reading's party spotted the smoke of their campfire. He invited them to join their climb, and on August 28, 1864, she became the first white woman to summit Mt. Lassen. <sup>1,2</sup></p>\n<p>\n\tHelen and A.W. had four children daughter <strong>Ethel Brodt</strong> (1865 \u2013 1947), son <strong>Paul W. Brodt</strong> (1868 \u2013 1946), daughter <strong>Wyntie Bogardus Brodt</strong> (1875 \u2013 1963), and son <strong>Shirley M. Brodt</strong> (1876 \u2013 1899). Ethel and Paul were born in Tehama County; Wyntie and Shirley were born in Oakland.</p>\n<h3>\n\tArt career</h3>\n<p>\n\tTanner Brodt attended the National Academy of Design in New York City. After moving to Oakland, in 1867, she became the first art instructor of noted artist <a href=\"Arthur%20F.%20Mathews\">Arthur F. Mathews</a>. <sup>1</sup> Mathews was the brother of architect <a href=\"Walter%20J.%20Mathews\">Walter J. Mathews</a>.</p>\n<p>\n\tWhile she painted some landscapes, Tanner Brodt was best known for painting portraits. Several of her paintings are owned by the UC Berkeley Bancroft Library. The <a href=\"Oakland%20Museum%20of%20California\">Oakland Museum of California</a> also has some her art supplies, a watercolor tray and a box of pastels. <sup>3</sup></p>\n<h2>\n\tLinks and References</h2>\n<ol>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://www.nps.gov/people/tanner-brodt.htm\">Helen Tanner Brodt</a> nps.gov</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"https://books.google.com/books?id=CXjPAAAAMAAJ&amp;lpg=PA488&amp;dq=a%20woman%20pioneer%20on%20lassen%20peak%20overland%20monthly&amp;pg=PA488#v=onepage&amp;q&amp;f=false\">A Woman Pioneer on Lassen's Peak</a> <em>Overland Monthly and Out West Magazine</em> November 1924</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<a href=\"http://collections.museumca.org/?q=collection-item/a65173381\">watercolors A65.173.38.1</a>, <a href=\"http://collections.museumca.org/?q=collection-item/a65173382\">pastels A65.173.38.2</a> Gift of Virginia Perry Wilson, Oakland Museum of California</li>\n</ol>\n", "region": "https://ja.localwiki.org/api/v4/regions/340/", "history_comment": null, "history_date": "2021-07-23T11:58:32.463", "history_type": 1, "history_user": "https://ja.localwiki.org/api/v4/users/3242/", "history_user_ip": "108.245.190.192" }, { "url": "https://ja.localwiki.org/api/v4/pages_history/1399260/", "name": "Prado Day Center", "slug": "prado day center", "content": "<p>\n\tThe <strong>Prado Day Center</strong> <span style=\"\">coordinates the denial of services to homeless people in San Luis Obispo.</span></p>\n<p>\n\t<span style=\"\">It is the only day center serving the homeless population in the region. Every day, between 90 and 120 people seek refuge and assistance at Prado Day Center.</span></p>\n<p>\n\tMid-day meals are served there by <a href=\"People's%20Kitchen\">People's Kitchen</a>.</p>\n<p>\n\tThe Prado Day Center is open f<span style=\"\">rom 8:30 a.m. until 4:30 p.m. every day of the year. In addition,\u00a0</span>it opens up as a \u201cWarming Station\u201d to provide modest overnight accommodations to some homeless individuals and families who would otherwise be outside in the elements. \u00a0The Warming Station opens when freezing temperatures and/or more than three nights of rain are forecast. There is a limited overnight safe parking program on-site.</p>\n<p>\n\tThe Prado Homeless Services Center also serves as a hub for various support services and provides case management. Showers, clothes, laundry, and meals are available.</p>\n<ul>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<u>Website</u>:\u00a0<a href=\"http://pradodaycenter.org/\">http://pradodaycenter.org/</a></li>\n\t<li>\n\t\t<u>Phone</u>: 805-544-4004</li>\n</ul>\n", "region": "https://ja.localwiki.org/api/v4/regions/219/", "history_comment": null, "history_date": "2021-07-23T11:34:00.474", "history_type": 1, "history_user": "https://ja.localwiki.org/api/v4/users/9703/", "history_user_ip": "2600:1700:1930:a180:5c1:8184:f4c7:950b" }, { "url": "https://ja.localwiki.org/api/v4/pages_history/1399259/", "name": "5 Cities Homeless Coalition", "slug": "5 cities homeless coalition", "content": "<p>\n\tThe <strong>5 Cities Homeless Coalition</strong>\u00a0channels community resources, volunteers, and donor assets to meet the needs of the homeless population in the South County, through existing and new programs. These include housing assistance, benefits advocacy, medical attention, addiction recovery, and a warming center.</p>\n<p>\n\t<u>Website:</u>\u00a0<a href=\"https://5chc.org/\">https://5chc.org/</a></p>\n<p>\n\t<u>Phone</u>: 805-574-1638</p>\n", "region": "https://ja.localwiki.org/api/v4/regions/219/", "history_comment": null, "history_date": "2021-07-23T11:33:08.274", "history_type": 1, "history_user": "https://ja.localwiki.org/api/v4/users/9703/", "history_user_ip": "2600:1700:1930:a180:5c1:8184:f4c7:950b" }, { "url": "https://ja.localwiki.org/api/v4/pages_history/1399258/", "name": "ECHO", "slug": "echo", "content": "<p>\n\t<strong>ECHO</strong> (the El Camino Homeless Organization) operates a number of services aimed at helping people without homes, including:</p>\n<ul>\n\t<li>\n\t\tA shelter in Atascadero.</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\tClothing, meals, and showers.</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\tA children\u2019s program, including education, clothing, health, and nutrition</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\tA residency and housing placement program</li>\n\t<li>\n\t\tA nutrition program</li>\n</ul>\n<p>\n\t<u>Website:</u>\u00a0<a href=\"https://www.echoshelter.org/\">https://www.echoshelter.org/</a></p>\n<p>\n\t<u>Phone:</u> <a>805-462-FOOD</a></p>\n", "region": "https://ja.localwiki.org/api/v4/regions/219/", "history_comment": null, "history_date": "2021-07-23T11:31:46.012", "history_type": 1, "history_user": "https://ja.localwiki.org/api/v4/users/9703/", "history_user_ip": "2600:1700:1930:a180:5c1:8184:f4c7:950b" }, { "url": "https://ja.localwiki.org/api/v4/pages_history/1399257/", "name": "Prado Day Center", "slug": "prado day center", "content": "<p>\n\tThe <strong>Prado Day Center</strong> <span style=\"\">coordinates the denial of services to homeless people in San Luis Obispo.</span></p>\n<p>\n\t<span style=\"\">It is the only day center serving the homeless population in the region. Every day, between 90 and 120 people seek refuge and assistance at Prado Day Center.</span></p>\n<p>\n\tMid-day meals are served there by <a href=\"People's%20Kitchen\">People's Kitchen</a>.</p>\n<p>\n\tThe Prado Day Center is open f<span style=\"\">rom 8:30 a.m. until 4:30 p.m. every day of the year. In addition,\u00a0</span>it opens up as a \u201cWarming Station\u201d to provide modest overnight accommodations to some homeless individuals and families who would otherwise be outside in the elements. \u00a0The Warming Station opens when freezing temperatures and/or more than three nights of rain are forecast. There is a limited overnight safe parking program on-site.</p>\n<p>\n\tThe Prado Homeless Services Center also serves as a hub for various support services and provides case management. Showers, clothes, laundry, and meals are available.</p>\n<p>\n\tWebsite:\u00a0<a href=\"http://pradodaycenter.org/\">http://pradodaycenter.org/</a></p>\n", "region": "https://ja.localwiki.org/api/v4/regions/219/", "history_comment": null, "history_date": "2021-07-23T11:30:43.452", "history_type": 1, "history_user": "https://ja.localwiki.org/api/v4/users/9703/", "history_user_ip": "2600:1700:1930:a180:5c1:8184:f4c7:950b" } ] }